One of the things I hear people complain about often is the “dealer warranty.” That is, you bought a used car and the selling dealer threw in its own warranty. Usually something slipshod like “3 months/3K miles - Eng/Trans.” Gee - what could go wrong there?

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In the land of warranties, there is the glovebox warranty - the one that comes with a new car and is described in the warranty booklet in the glovebox. Hence, the name.

Then there are third-party warranties (and service contracts) where someone other than the seller or manufacturer will (may) fix your car if/when it breaks down.

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And finally, I often hear about the vague warranty given by the seller, often evidenced by nothing more than a couple of words and word fragments written on the Buyer’s Guide. What are the terms and conditions of the “3-mo’s/3K mi - Eng./Trans” warranty? Your guess is as good as mine.

But neither of us will guess as good as the dealer - who is the one who will be telling you what is really covered by that warranty. And that is usually what he/she feels like fixing before he/she gets tired of your whining.

So this week’s podcast explains this and more. For one thing, there is one bright side to these warranties which I suspect the dealers don’t want me to tell you (it prohibits them from selling you the car as-is.) So, here is the audio:

And the video:

Follow me on Twitter: @stevelehto

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Steve Lehto has been practicing law for 25 years, almost exclusively in consumer protection and Michigan lemon law. He wrote The Lemon Law Bible and Chrysler’s Turbine Car: The Rise and Fall of Detroit’s Coolest Creation.

This website may supply general information about the law but it is for informational purposes only. This does not create an attorney-client relationship and is not meant to constitute legal advice, so the good news is we’re not billing you by the hour for reading this. The bad news is that you shouldn’t act upon any of the information without consulting a qualified professional attorney who will, probably, bill you by the hour.