Feliz diez y seis de septiembre, Oppo! Happy Mexican Independence Day!

(Above, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto delivers the Grito de Independencia last night at the Capitol).

On this day in 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo spurred his countrymen to revolt against Spain in a bid for Mexican independence. The moment has since been celebrated as Mexican Independence Day because of how it served as the catalyst of Mexico’s war for independence, which was finally won and recognized in 1821.

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Each year, thousands gather in front of the National Palace to celebrate and hear the president recite the Grito de Independencia (translated into English):

I may be a Texan, but for many Texans like me, this is still an important moment in the history of our culture and even the land we live on. Texas was part of Mexico until 1836, when a group of Texians declared independence of their own (which, in its 10 year history as a sovereign nation, was never officially recognized by Mexico).

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It was another several years after that war was won that the southern border of Texas was finally agreed upon. (Previously, it was disputed whether the Nueces River or the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo served as the border between the two young nations).

It’s more than just a play on words to say that we didn’t cross the border, the border crossed us.

So, happy birthday, Mexico!

Oh, and just to keep this car-related, here’s the original Mexican sportscar, the Mastretta MXT! I keep a Hot Wheels version of the car on display at my office. :D