We’ve all seen the videos of mechanics taking cars for joyrides. And we’ve heard about it on the news too. But what are the legal ramifications - or remedies? Here’s the podcast answer to your questions.

Joyriding has been going on ever since the first car’s inventor left his car unattended for the first time. Or so I assume.

Advertisement

I wrote about a joyride of a client’s car here and that got a few heads shaking. I even worked at a gas station once where a CO-WORKER (NOT ME!) took a classic car for a joyride (but did not get caught).

The questions arise: How illegal is this? Could someone go to jail? Can you sue someone for this? The answer are “kind of,” “yes,” and “yes.” But if you want the narrative form - with full sentences and such, here is the audio:

And the video:

The pic at the top is of my latest book. According to Amazon, the book is coming out tomorrow. And yes, it is a hardcover. Take that, Mr. Cochrane (my high school English teacher who thought I was illiterate)!

Follow me on Twitter: @stevelehto

Hear my podcast on iTunes: Lehto’s Law

Steve Lehto has been practicing law for 24 years, almost exclusively in consumer protection and Michigan lemon law. He wrote The Lemon Law Bible and Chrysler’s Turbine Car: The Rise and Fall of Detroit’s Coolest Creation.

Advertisement

This website may supply general information about the law but it is for informational purposes only. This does not create an attorney-client relationship and is not meant to constitute legal advice, so the good news is we’re not billing you by the hour for reading this. The bad news is that you shouldn’t act upon any of the information without consulting a qualified professional attorney who will, probably, bill you by the hour.