I’ve reached the point with my 924 where I no longer have any fucks left to give. The more I dig into the car, the more problems I find, worn mechanical parts, multiple cosmetic issues, and the big one, rust. The outside doesn’t look to bad, but don’t let it fool you, there is bubbling starting in the corners of the front fenders, and there are a few finger sized holes around the window trim. The battery tray and the underside are where this car starts to show it’s true colors. First off, the battery tray.

I forgot to take a before picture but this is how much I had to cut out. When I bought the car this was poorly fiber glassed over and painted, which in the dim light of the sellers garage, I didn’t notice. I only noticed when after a bit of rain my passenger floor was soaked. That discovery led me to this discovery, the passenger floor.

Yikes. There’s a much smaller hole on the driver side as well, plus some rocker panel rot a little further back on the drivers side too.

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At $1300 I paid to much for the car, but on the other hand, a running driving, fun to drive Porsche (even a slow one) that gets somewhere near 30 mpg (ODO broke, just a guesstimate) that I can now use as a fun beater for $1300 still seams like not such a bad deal. Still, with all of this rust and upwards of 180,000 miles this car is likely bound for the scrapper. Sad side note, there is another 924 at the Ewe-Pullet lot (that’s seriously what they named it) that is basically free of rust, and they won’t sell the shell or the whole car otherwise I’d think of buying it and swapping all the bad with the good. Back to my point, this car is nearing the end of it’s life, but I still want to have some fun with it, which results in repairs that I’d absolutely hate, if I actually had any fucks to give. Repairs such as this.

That’s the passenger foot well. No I didn’t cut out any of the old metal, and no I didn’t form any sheet metal to match the holes. I simply wire wheeled off all of the rust I could, slathered it in several very heavy coats of Rustoleum, slapped on some painted flat sheet metal and sealed every hole and seam I could find with copious amounts of silicone. It isn’t pretty, it isn’t right, but it keeps the water out, and your feet in, and with the carpet down you can’t really tell. So.... go enough. Also, before anyone freaks out I did a fairly throughout check of all the actual structural metal that runs below the floor and all of it still felt thick and strong, no worries there.

The battery tray was a little better fix, I actually cut and formed that piece to shape (forgot pics) but after attempting and failing to slowly tack weld the new tray in to place, it was secured into place using metal filler from a tube, JB Stick Weld, and again, copious amounts of silicone and Rustoleum. After a significant amount of rain last night I can confirm that it holds water. I’ll likely relocate the battery so there isn’t any stress on the new tray, but it works for now.

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So now I’ve got a beater Porsche, on one hand it’s sad because I don’t want to see a cool car die, but on the other it’s a relief because I simply don’t care what happens to it anymore, that means winter driving and impromptu gravel road rally cross.

Bonus doggo for your time.

I let her out before I went to work, and when I opened my door to put my cup in my truck she hopped right in wanting to go for a ride.