Looks like Euro 7 emissions standards may make it financially unsustainable for Renault to produce diesels for Europe altogether:

Honestly... given the NOx-driven smog problems that European cities are experiencing right now, that’s not a bad thing, IMO. And, fundamentally, it’s not practical to limit NOx on a diesel to the levels that a stoichiometric-combustion gasoline engine produces, in my opinion - you end up having to have multiple aftertreatment systems (the best diesels right now have two EGR systems, an oxidation catalyst, a lean NOx trap, a selective catalytic reduction system, and a hydrogen sulfide trap), and that’s just not sustainable on anything that isn’t in the premium market.

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That said, AFAIK, Renault’s current approach is downsized and turbocharged direct injected gasoline engines, which isn’t the answer either, IMO - particulate emissions are a huge problem there, and particulate traps aren’t the answer to that problem (they’re very effective while they work, at least on diesels... but when they fail, they’re often very expensive to fix, and often they’re illegally removed). Unfortunately, the current downsize and turbocharge trend is also producing automotive platforms that are dependent on small displacement engines, and we may all be in for a few years of pain before platforms start either supporting heavy hybridization or larger engines.