There is a disproportionate number of problems in this world caused by car sales between relatives. If you do not know this yet, you just haven’t been around enough. But I get the phone calls at my office . . .

You think you’re helping out your brother/sister/cousin/deadbeat-dad by selling him/her/it the car you’ve been driving successfully for the last 5 years. A week after the sale they call to tell you the engine blew up. Can they have their money back? Will you pay to fix it? Did you do this to them on purpose, you poor excuse for a relative?!

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Like all my other advice, you are free to disregard everything I say. After all, most people do. Where do you think my clients come from!? But the point is that you should familiarize yourself with the pitfalls of such a transaction before you embark on it. Go in with your eyes open. That way, you won’t be able to call and tell me I should have warned you. I did. Here’s the audio:

And the video:

And the pic above is a pile of my new book. Should be on Amazon any second now. Meanwhile, anyone who wants a signed copy and cares to navigate the intricacies of the internet, feel free to email me directly: Lehto@kennon.com.

Follow me on Twitter: @stevelehto

Hear my podcast on iTunes: Lehto’s Law

Steve Lehto has been practicing law for 24 years, almost exclusively in consumer protection and Michigan lemon law. He wrote The Lemon Law Bible and Chrysler’s Turbine Car: The Rise and Fall of Detroit’s Coolest Creation.

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