Every few days, someone calls me to complain about how a car seller “lied” to them and now they want to sue the seller. For some reason, people don’t understand that people can lie all day long and there’s often nothing you can do about it legally. Thus, this week’s podcast.

There are a variety of common lies that car sellers have in their arsenal. “This car runs great.” “This is a great price for this car.” “You have to buy the GAP coverage.” Yes, those - and more! - are lies. And if you don’t know that when you hear them, then that’s on you.

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You can’t sue someone simply because they lied to you. Don’t get me wrong: There are some kinds of lies they cannot tell and some possilble consequences from some kinds of fraudulent lies that could lead to a legal cause of action. But the MERE act of lying does not mean the person can be sued.

And, in this day and age, most of the stuff a car seller might lie to you about can be checked on the internet. Great price? Do some research. The last car of its kind in the county? That’s easy enough to look into.

So, this week’s podcast. The audio:

And the video:

And the top pic is simply a car I saw in traffic. It demonstrates one of the advantages of being a Mason: You can obscure your license plate with a Masonic plate cover and the police cannot pull you over for having an obscured plate. After all, Masons outrank cops.

Follow me on Twitter: @stevelehto

Hear my podcast on iTunes: Lehto’s Law

Steve Lehto has been practicing law for 23 years, almost exclusively in consumer protection and Michigan lemon law. He wrote The Lemon Law Bible and Chrysler’s Turbine Car: The Rise and Fall of Detroit’s Coolest Creation.

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