As regular viewers of Lehto’s Law know, my dogs ignore the “ON AIR” signs and occasionally walk through the background of my videos. This leads to the obvious question: Which dog made the best cameo appearance - Milo or Wolfy?

I have been doing the podcast Lehto’s Law now for almost a year and added a video component to the project a few weeks back. It’s all a learning experience - even for my shelties, Milo and Wolfy. (See pic: Wolfy on left, Milo right.) You have not heard from them yet because they are relatively shy when it comes to cameras and microphones and so far, the UPS man has not knocked while I was recording.

Deliverymen disappear in these parts but it’s not a quiet affair. The tumult would force me to stop recording until the fur settled. But I digress.

Keen-eyed viewers caught Milo’s first walk-on in one of my videos a few weeks back. He did not speak but his presence permeated the very fabric of the show.

Wolfy, perhaps jealous of the media attention, boldly strolled across the set this past week, drawing both criticism (from Milo) and praise (me, “Good boy.”) Which brings us to the questions all of the Gawkersphere is asking: Whose walk-on was stronger? Was Milo’s inspired? Was Wolfy’s derivative?

I studied this and came to the one and only possible conclusion.

It was a tie.

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I will now run from the building as spectators pelt me with insults and physical objects for taking the obvious easy-way-out when trying to choose between children. Can you blame me? These guys know where I live.

Meanwhile, here is the podcast he walked through:

https://soundcloud.com/stevelehto/how…

And the video:

Follow me on Twitter: @stevelehto

Hear my podcast on iTunes: Lehto’s Law

Steve Lehto has been practicing law for 23 years, almost exclusively in consumer protection and Michigan lemon law. He wrote The Lemon Law Bible and Chrysler’s Turbine Car: The Rise and Fall of Detroit’s Coolest Creation.

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