“I feel that life is measured in achievement, not in years alone.”
“I feel that life is measured in achievement, not in years alone.”
Illustration for article titled 2019/2020 Honda Accord LX: The Oppositelock Review

For decades, sedans have been the go-to for family transportation. With the rise of CUVs, this is changing and the market is dying; that doesn’t mean they won’t go out with a bang, though. Here is Honda’s recently revamped car in base trim glory, the Accord.

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(Full disclosure: our minivan decided to lose its suspension, engine mounts, transmission, axles and more so Honda gave us a loaner for the month+ it’s taking for the Odyssey to get repaired. We had a couple more loaners in between but as of the time of publishing we got this exact Accord back. (5/01/19)

Another note as of 5/23/20: this is a year overdue but since it’s the time of the year where the Odyssey shits the bed and we get another loaner Accord LX, it’s only fitting I come back and finish it finally.)

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What Is It?

The Accord is Honda’s midsize sedan positioned above the Civic and Insight. As of the introduction of this generation in 2018, it’s only available in the U.S. as a sedan. This specific one is a 2019 model year LX trim with the CVT and 192hp 1.5L turbocharged Earth Dreams VTEC 4-cylinder engine. (God that was a mouthful.) It comes standard with a backup camera, Bluetooth, Honda Sensing, cloth seats, and actual alloy wheels instead of previous generations’ steel wheels and covers. It is set to compete with other sedans such as the Toyota Camry, Nissan Altima/Maxima, Mazda Mazda6, and Chevrolet Malibu. From what I’ve seen, the competition has some catching up to do. (We had a 2018 Altima SL loaner after the Accord; we despised it after coming from this car.)

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Exterior: 9/10

Illustration for article titled 2019/2020 Honda Accord LX: The Oppositelock Review
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The Accord is very sleek and though it had a lot of “grille” (read: black plastic), it wore it better, conveying a smoother, less angular look that doesn’t make you feel like it would snap and eat you at any second. It has two exhausts (though mostly hidden), and a big chrome bar that carries the Honda logo up front. On higher trims there are bigger dual exhaust cutouts and the chrome bar is a darker finish, but the LX still looks good without those options. Overall it’s a clean, sleek, well put together modern design that mostly works, save for the weird chrome trim overhang by the C-pillar and Honda Sensing box in the middle of the “grille”. The following slideshow contains more exterior shots and close-ups for those interested.

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Interior: 8/10

Illustration for article titled 2019/2020 Honda Accord LX: The Oppositelock Review
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The interior was a nice place to be, the steering wheel was easy to grip and the buttons on it were easily accessible as well. The screen proved to be pretty annoying and sometimes the sun glare would reflect off it and that was a nuisance when driving. It also, as with many cars today, looks like a tacked-on afterthought and I feel like they could’ve integrated it better. As a passenger, though, it wasn’t too bad and was easy to operate because you have more time to figure it out but still, drivers don’t always have passengers to help with that. However, unlike most screens, it still has buttons for the most basic functions, and that is slightly helpful as far as modern infotainment goes. Either way, apart from your preference there, the interior was good. The speedo/tachometer were positioned well and you could change the “tach” to display fuel range, traffic signs/speed limit and more. The interior materials weren’t bad for an entry-level Accord, the seats were comfortable and the dash was made of leatherette/soft plastic seeming stuff that wasn’t bad and there’s plenty of storage as well. The rear has a lot of legroom (I’m 6 feet tall) and the seats were also very comfortable. Here’s some more pictures of the interior:

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Driving Dynamics

This segment will cover the acceleration, handling, transmission, fuel economy, comfort on trips and spirited driving. Without further ado, here we go.

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Acceleration/Passing/Transmission/Spirited Driving and last but not least, Handling: 8/10 overall

The Accord’s 192 horsepower turbo-4 is punchy and has a nice growl to it as it lurches you forward at a decent push of the accelerator. It has no trouble getting up to speed to pass the guy on his phone going 35 in a 50 zone on a straight, open road. It was tested by Car and Driver with a 7.3 second 0-60 time with this exact engine/trans combo. The CVT transmission was smooth and delivered the power in an efficient and non-annoying way, contrary to many CVTs available. On the empty, winding road leading to my house, I decided to give it some and it picked up and took those curves like a champ at an undisclosed high speed. Overall, it was pretty quick and smooth for being the base configuration.

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Fuel Economy and Comfort: 8/10 and 6/10, respectively

From my mom dailying it to work and back for the almost-month we had it, she averaged 29 combined MPG, which is by no means a slouch when it comes to her rather lead-footed driving style. As for comfort, well...it’s not “pebble in the road=sudden death” jolting, but it most definitely isn’t silky smooth either. To some this may not be a problem, as feeling the road develops a sense of connection between you and the ride, but after riding in an SUV and minivan for the more memorable years of my short life it felt pretty rough. Also, getting in and out of the car is...not ideal for the older folks or people with some sort of ailment or disability. The car itself is barely lower than your average car today (read: still pretty low) but the seating position, even at its highest, is somewhere between the 4th and 8th ring. It’s pretty far down. Otherwise the seats and overall ergonomics were comfortably made and somewhat made up for some of the ride quality’s minor downfalls.

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Total: 39/50

Honestly that number looks a lot worse than it is, and I was nitpicking a bit but overall the car was pretty great. Starting at only $24,020, it’s worth the money and I’d say has the competition beat. If you can shave a grand or more off the price, it gets better. If you wanted to know anything about it that I haven’t covered here or isn’t in some other review somewhere, let me know; it’s a whole year after I began writing this and under the same circumstances I have the car again. Thanks for reading.

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