Waiting at a red light on a slight incline, I gently tap my Camaro’s throttle pedal while feathering out its clutch just at the moment the light turns green. If this were a drag race, my reaction time would be spectacular. But this is not a drag race, and within milliseconds of disengaging the clutch I feel it happen. Womp! The car stalls and dies. A horn blares from behind me.

I throw the clutch back in and twist the ignition key. Chug, chug, chug, chug. Nothing. More horns chime in. I twist the ignition key again. Chug, chug, chug, chug. Nothing. Another horn joins in the cacophony.

Once more I twist the key. Chug, chug, chug, chug. Vroom! The engine comes back to life. Gas in, clutch out, tires kicking up asphalt. The Camaro and I hustle our way to the nearest side street, at which point I look down at the big coupe’s gauge cluster. Although I can hear the engine pleasantly firing away, the tachometer’s needle points its orange glow at the ‘0’ mark and the display screen warns me to service the StabiliTrak system immediately.

Unsure of what’s gone wrong, or if the Camaro will even restart if I shut it down again, I high-tail it to the nearest Chevrolet dealership. Unfortunately, it’s Sunday and the service center is closed for the day. I’ll return tomorrow morning, I think. Except the car, once again, barely chugs to life. Best to leave it overnight.

The next morning I take the train to the dealership. The service tech reports that he had no trouble starting the car before my arrival; however, he agrees to look into the issue. Hours later, the problem re-emerges. The service tech calls to tell me the bad news - the crankshaft positioning sensor is on its way out. Fortunately, the $84.32 in parts and labor to replace the faulty part is covered under Chevrolet’s warranty. The tech tells me that I can pick the car up in an hour.

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I return to the service center, sign some paperwork, and retrieve my keys. The car fires up right away.