(part one here)

Ok, so last time, we shed some weight out of the core of the case. Now it’s time to get the transmission out of that catch-pan and up where it’s easier to work on. I don’t have a transmission stand and I don’t feel like buying one, so I’m gonna show you guys how I use a standard engine stand.

But first, we’re gonna pull the bottom pan, filter, and valve body out, then fish out some accumulator pistons:

This close-up of the magnet is almost as fuzzy as the magnet itself.

Advertisement

Now we can see the filter and the valve body
With the filter out of the way, we can start loosening some of the valve body bolts. BUT NOT ALL OF THEM!
With some finagling, the valve body comes out, along with the manual (gear selector) shaft.

Advertisement

Whoops, looks like part of the electrical connector stayed behind in the case. We’ll have to do something about that later.
These pistons (overdrive and underdrive) slide right out
This spring too, and that leftover part of the electrical connector. To the left, we have another piston behind a snap-ring & cap to fish out.

Advertisement

(Note: I did a lot of things out of order, so I’m trying to reconstruct the process here in a way that makes more sense than what I actually did. There’s a parking pawl here, but I didn’t remove until later. The next picture below shows it already removed from the case.)

Now that the hydraulics are out of the way, the bottom of the case looks something like this:

Advertisement

Now we’re ready to mount it on the stand. First, we remove the head from the engine stand...

...and bolt it right up to the case, using the bolt-holes from the pan. To avoid damage to the aluminum, each bolt gets a nylon washer where it meets the case:

Oversize nuts and large washers make up for these bolts being too long

Advertisement

Despite having partially gutted the transmission, it’s still pretty heavy. The good news is, we just have to wrestle the head back onto the stand, instead of trying to line up the bolts the hard way. Eat your Wheaties, lift with your legs, and voila!

To be continued... 41TE Teardown, Pt. III