Time to finish gutting the case.

(The nice thing about removing the geartrain is that the case no longer has an awkward amount of weight on one side. It’s much easier to rotate on the stand now.)

Underneath the 2-4 clutch piston, we find some friction & steel plates...
...then some more (low/reverse)
And now the rear planetary carrier can come out

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We’re almost there! But we need another special tool...

That bit that looks like the window of a TIE fighter is a strong spring. The eight fingers press upward against an external snap-ring that’s wrapped around that inner “snout”. All fingers must be compressed simultaneously, or else removal of the snap-ring could shave off some aluminum from the snout.

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So instead of buying some fancy Miller tool, let’s just make our own! A little bit of DIY hardware clamps this big PVC coupler against the spring, while allowing some room for my snap-ring pliers. Take that, Chrysler!

Now the snap-ring and spring are released

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Then this low/reverse clutch piston comes out...
Unbolt the low/reverse clutch piston retainer
...and remove said retainer. Don’t forget the gasket!

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The bottom of the case

Some bits are staying on the case, but it’s otherwise empty. I removed the test port plugs (located underneath the solenoid pack), but I am leaving the brass cooler nipples in place. Also, the bearings and their races are all in good shape, so the two output races are staying pressed into the case.

This is what’s known as a “soft parts” rebuild. (Soft parts are the basic wear items found in rebuild kits: friction plates, gaskets, seals, etc. “Hard parts” are the major components that are often totally reusable. Sometimes you do have to replace shafts, drums, gears, bearings & races, etc.)

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Now that the case is empty, it’s ready for cleaning. But we’re not done with disassembly yet...

Next up: sub-assembly teardown! 41TE Teardown, Pt. V