With the car safely home from HPDE back in April, a few issues that had made themselves apparent now needed fixing.

The valve cover gaskets were seeping oil, so I went ahead and painted my spare set of covers and put them on with fresh gaskets. I love the white/black/red NASA-inspired color theme.

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The biggest takeaway from HPDE was how much I was under-using the brakes, and needed to brake harder. By the end of the day the front brakes were pretty toasty, with the pads starting to glaze and the rotors starting to warp after the last session’s cooldown. The rear brakes were basically like-new though.

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Solution: remove the stock proportioning valve and install an adjustable valve for the rear brakes. This will accomplish two things: allow me to fine tune how much force goes to the rear brakes, and split the front and rear circuits for safety/redundancy.

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I wanted to be able to reach the adjuster knob from the driver’s seat so I made a little mounting bracket and welded it to the shifter riser.

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A couple adapters and two 4-foot sections of steel brake tubing complete this end of the circuit.

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The lines run under the shifter and through a pre-existing grommet in the firewall.

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Without much room to hand-bend the lines, it’s not the prettiest install ever, but so far nothing leaks or rattles and it seems to work as intended. Fortunately all of this is hidden behind the engine so you don’t have to look at it.

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I’d had a stainless clutch line laying around for a while, and this seemed as good a time as any to install it. What’s one more bleeder valve when you’re already doing the brakes anyway?

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If you’ve been keeping up with this build so far it’s probably pretty clear that this is a low-budget endeavor. That means funds for events are hard to come by, but I’m hoping to make it out to my first two-day HPDE event at Dominion in September. I can’t wait!