Production of the Bugatti Veyron has officially ended. All 450 Veyrons have been spoken for, and a staggering thirty-four unique special editions and one-offs exist. Here’s a guide to the most unique special edition Bugatti Veyrons.

1. Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Venet

Ever heard of the sculptor, Bernar Venet? Me neither, but Bugatti seems to regard him highly. They go so far as to call the Frenchman “one of the most influential contemporary sculptors of our time.” I may not be well versed in fine art, but I do appreciate aspects of the highly unique collaboration between Bugatti and Bernar Venet.

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The first thing you notice when you look at the Venet is the unique orange mathematical sequences lining the black exterior of the car. These seeemingly random sequences actually come from equations used to reach the Veyron’s legendary power output. According to Bugatti’s chief designer, “Bernar Venet doubly honors our brand by making reference to the technical formulae of our engineers without fully revealing their secrets.” These sequences continue on the brown leather interior of the car along with orange-stitched Bernar Venet signatures. A collection of Venet medallions can be found on the interior and exterior of the car, and the wheels feature a unique black and orange paint scheme. As with most famous artwork, Bugatti seemed to think this Veyron was priceless as they refused to give it a price at the time of its launch.

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2. Bugatti Veyron Super Sport World Record Edition

Bugatti customers are a demanding bunch. Apparently, 1,001 PS in the original Veyron wasn’t enough for them as they requested that Bugatti “not only design their second model optically differently but to also create a version with a sportier and more extreme driving experience.” The Super Sport was the answer to Bugatti customers’ prayers. Power output was bumped up to 1,200 PS, and Bugatti officially claimed the title for the fastest production car.

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The first five Veyron Super Sports to roll out of the Molsheim factory were coined World Record Editions in order to commemorate this feat. The World Record Edition is configured identically to the record setting car - the same one that averaged 431 km/h traveling both directions at the proving grounds of the Volkswagen Group at Ehra-Lessien in 2010. It features an exposed carbon fiber and orange exterior and a comparatively tamer interior featuring black leather and carbon fiber with subtle orange highlights.

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3. Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport L’Or Blanc

I can honestly say I’ve never looked at a porcelain statue and wondered why I had never seen the material used to build a car. Fortunately, someone at Bugatti did. “L’Or Blanc” is French for “white gold.” Bugatti partnered with the legendary white gold-producing Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Berlin (KPM) to release the “world’s first vehicle using porcelain elements for exterior and interior design.”

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The L’Or Blanc features a truly one-of-a-kind paint scheme to reflect the characteristic white and blue hues of porcelain. The striped design (those aren’t reflections from the light) is laid by hand using a precision tape from Japan, and at first glance, you might think the car was painted with porcelain. Genuine porcelain is used for the inlays of the center wheel badges, the fuel filler cap, the oil filler cap, and the “EB” badge at the rear. Inside, the L’Or Blanc features porcelain inlays on the sides of the center console, the rear panel between the seats, and a porcelain dish embedded atop the center console. The dish is removable and to be used with the rest of the KPM-designed L’Or Blanc picnic set. £1.65 million could have bought you the fastest porcelain ever made.

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4. Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse Legend Meo Costantini

Towards the end of the Veyron’s production, Bugatti began a six-part series, Les Legendes de Bugatti, intended to honor six special individuals. The third model honored Meo Costantini, a personal friend of the company founder, Ettore Bugatti. Costantini was also a driver for and eventual head of Bugatti’s factory racing team. As a driver, he won the Targa Florio on two occasions while piloting the famous Bugatti Type 35.

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“Meo Costantini embodies the most successful era in Bugatti”s racing history. When Bugatti created the Type 35, he inspired one of the most successful racing cars of all time.” The blue and hand-polished aluminum body panels truly pay homage to the winning Type 35. Costantini’s victories at Targa Florio in the Type 35 are commemorated with the painting of the silhouette of the track on the underside of the rear wing. His signature is laser-engraved into the fuel and oil caps and again embroidered on the interior head restraints. Another Targa Florio silhouette can be found on the stowage compartment cover in between the two seats. The silhouette is displayed in a milled and polished aluminum relief mounted to dark blue exposed carbon fiber. Perhaps my favorite touch, racing scenes illustrating the most important moments of Costantini’s career are laser-engraved onto the leather door trim. The price tag of the Legend Meo Costantini was £2.09 million and limited to three such examples as with all Legends cars.

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5. Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse Legend Black Bess

Just over a century ago, Bugattti manufactured the Type 18 with a 100 PS four cylinder engine. Today, the fifth model in the Legends series has four times the cylinders, twelve times the PS, and pays homage to what is arguably the most famous Type 18 - Black Bess.

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In 1913, Roland Garros, a famous French aviator, “was looking for a car which would enable him to travel as fast on land as he could in the air.” He became the proud owner of a Type 18 which would affectionately become known as Black Bess. The modern Legends Black Bess pays homage to the original in its black exterior and gold highlights. Some of the Veyron’s body panels (like the horseshoe) are even covered in 24-carat gold. The interior is filled with Bugatti’s Beige, Havanna, and Crimson leathers though the most notable features are the door and center console panels. The panels feature scenes of the original Black Bess and a Morane Saulnier Type H - Garros’s plane. Unlike in the Legend Meo Constantini, the scenes are hand painted. As a result, no two panels are alike. The price tag for this truly one-of-a-kind Veyron was £2.18 million.

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6. Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse La Finale

The Veyron rolled out of the Molsheim plant for the 450th and final time in 2015, and what better way to commemorate the occasion than with a one-off. The Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse La Finale pays homage to the chassis number one Veyron with its inverted red and black exposed carbon fiber color scheme.

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To commemorate the last Veyron, “La Finale” is painted in bright “Italian Red” lettering on the cars exterior (once below the right headlight and once on the rear wing’s underside). Black dancing elephant imprints can be found on the “hubcaps” and on the red fuel and oil caps as an ode to Rembrandt Bugatti; Rembrandt was a sculptor often remembered for his dancing elephant sculpture most famously found on the Type 41 Royale’s radiator cap. More elephants are found in the interior, notably on the stowage compartment cover in between the two seats. This elephant is cast in bronze, given a black patina, and then mounted to red exposed carbon fiber with “450/450” painted below. The interior also features cream colored “silk” leather like in chassis number one, though this time it is accompanied by red leather and tinted carbon fiber. Bugatti sold La Finale to a customer in the Middle East. The sale price is unknown.

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Content: Official Bugatti Press Releases
Image Credit: Bugatti/Serious Wheels