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Cabin air filter by blokes

Illustration for article titled Cabin air filter by blokes

I decided to start getting to know the Jag by turning some wrenches on it for this first time this evening via a new cabin air filter.

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This turns out to be the first thing I’ve run into on it suggesting it really is a car built by blokes. Instead of the common five minute cabin air filter change on most modern cars that involves some variation of lowering the glove box (maybe via removing a clip or two), and then having access, the Jag requires you to remove the entire glove box assembly. Actually, you have to remove two other trim panels and then you can remove the glove box assembly via seven torx head bolts.

It’s nice glove box; felt lined and with a nice rotary spring damper for smooth and controlled opening and closing, but it allows no access to the blower motor or cabin air filter without removing the whole thing. I thought it was curious the factory shop manual calls it a .8 in labor to change a cabin air filter, but I know I know why.

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All this, for a cabin air filter.
All this, for a cabin air filter.

The fsm also calls for a combination of certain climate control modes and holding the recirculation button for three seconds to put the recirculation flap motor in a service position to avoid the risk of damaging the flap or motor in a cabin air filter service. I don’t know it’s actually necessary, but I followed the directions like a good boy.

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Illustration for article titled Cabin air filter by blokes

Once you get it out reveals some neat touches. There’s some expensive looking structural aluminum under there, lots of sound insulation on things and some nice touches like felt lined wiring harness as an NVH measure. Neat.

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Illustration for article titled Cabin air filter by blokes

I gave it a new Wix charcoal activated cabin air filter. It had an OEM Jag/LR filter in it that while ready to be changed shows that had clearly been changed in the past. The service records confirm this, but it was nice to see that it had actually been done. Given that it is a fiddly, slightly time consuming job, this is the kind of job that a less scrupulous dealer tech might be tempted to charge the .8 for, but not actually do knowing the likelihood of it causing them an issue to be very low.

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Nothing was hard about this, just a bit time consuming. It feels like the blokes might have taken a slightly longer away around to get this solution. Grading this, I’d have to knock a few points off for overall design concept, but they earned nearly full marks for build quality here. I’d only dock a point for wire ties cut with regular side cutters instead of flush cut side cutters, but to be honest that’s a pretty minor nit to pick. I might put it up on jack stands for an oil change tomorrow and continue getting to know it better. I’m still a very satisfied Jag owner with this car.

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