What we do have, surprisingly enough, is a fuckload of bus brands. So many in fact, that most buses in the US and Canada are built in Canada. There are only about four major bus brands that sell buses in the US and Canada that aren’t Canadian, Alexander Dennis (based in Scotland, makes pretty much all the transit double deckers in North America), Gillig (based in California), BYD (electric buses only, based in China) and ElDorado National (also based in California).

The rest are Canadian, this includes;

New Flyer (based in Winnipeg), probably the biggest bus maker in North America. Most buses you see on the road are probably New Flyers.

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Nova Bus (based in Quebec), formed from the remnants of GM’s once almost monopolistic bus division. When they started, they took over production of GM’s Classic from MCI (we’ll get to them) and the RTS lineup from TMC (NOT to be confused with GMC, the original makers of the RTS line of buses).

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Grande West (based in British Columbia), the newest addition to the Canadian bus industry. Essentially created out of BC Transit (British Columbia’s provincial transit agency)‘s desire to replace their aging Plaxton Pointer fleet. Thus, the Grande West Vicinity was created from a Chinese design. Many other Canadian (and a couple of American) agencies have bought the buses since, mostly to replace less practical van and truck-based cutaway buses.

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Motor Coach Industries (MCI) (also based in Winnipeg), owned by New Flyer since 2015 and also the largest coach bus builder in North America.

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Prevost Car (also based in Quebec), isn’t techinically Canadian, as they are owned by Volvo these days. But, they are still based in Quebec and make most of their buses in Quebec. Due to being owned by Volvo, Prevost also sell European Volvo coach models in the US and Canada, though the Prevost coaches are far more popular. Daimler does a similar thing by selling Setra coaches at Freightliner dealers. Prevost coaches are so popular, even the president of the US has one.

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There also was Orion (headquartered in Ontario), formerly owned by Daimler until they shut down their North American bus division (excluding Setra coaches) in 2013. Orion was originally founded by the Ontario government to build buses specially fit for Ontarian cities and conditions. Then, in 1995 they were sold to the then Australian-owned Canadian truck company Western Star, and then Western Star was bought by Daimler in the early 2000s, including Orion. Orions never really made their way out of Ontario all that much, excluding New York which has quite a few VIIs still in service.

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One interesting thing is that Orion in the 80s sold articulated Hungarian Ikarus buses in Canada. They were hideously unreliable, like Eastern Bloc vehicles tended to be, and they were all replaced by contemporary North American artics within a few years. I believe only Ottawa and Toronto actually bought the buses.