With the glamorous Monaco GP over, comes flying news that some of the teams already look like they spent to much at their champagne tabs at the posh event.

F1's hall of shame:combined team profit and loss over the past three years*

Marussia: -£140,612,000

Lotus: -£111,949,323

Force India: -£85,873,000

Mercedes: -£43,336,000

Red Bull: +£2,016,000

STR: +£2,919,214

Caterham: +£7,713,000

Williams: +£13,951,563

McLaren: +£34,984,000

TOTAL: -£320,186,546

*Data from 2010 to 2012 team accounts

Certainly feels like a victory for one of the smallest outfits out there.

Even though Marussia scored their first points, in the past 3 years they have been the biggest loser. No, their cars didn't lose weight, they leaked money. According to Forbes, the F1 teams have a combined loss of U$ 520.6 million, with the Russian's bleeding to the tune of U$ 228.6; which is probably worst than being shot by an AK-47. So what do the points scored on Sunday's race mean? Well, first of all, if Marussia keeps its current championship standing, it will receive U$ 48.1 million which is an increase of U$ 34.4 million from last years prize money. If they are lucky, this will help them survive another season, specially now that Marussia Cars has ceased operations as a manufacturer.

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Maybe a dildo/vibe manufacturer would like to purchase the team.

While Marussia hold on to the wire, Caterham is looking for new owners. And if Tony Fernandes is lucky enough to sell the entire [Caterham] group for his reportedly asking prize of U$ 589 million; who is to say that the F1 operation isn't in danger as Fernandes has already threatened to cease funding if their results do no improve this season. A new owner might not be so fond of losing money all around.

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No!!! Not the face!!!

As much as I believe in the theory of evolution and survival of the fittest, I'd hate to see two teams close down. Look at the dire situation of getting an F1 seat, though things have recently been distorted by the rise of pay-drivers; specially in the independent teams. And in order for the sport to keep going with its pedal to the carbon fiber, I guess the larger teams have to start looking into a cost cap. Sure the teams that are now on risk of closing down their garages are fairly new, but think about the situation Lotus had last season. Who could guarantee, that a staple name like Williams F1 would not face the same fate in the near future (William is floated on Frankfurt Stock Exchange), given the ever increasing cost and difficulties in getting those Tobacco purse size sponsor deals (just look at McLaren this season already).

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Sources: Forbes; Bloomberg

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