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I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub

Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub

I needed to add some utility to the Cub to make it useful for what I want it for. Bags specific to these old models are hard to come by are $$$ as all get out, so I set out to DIY my own. I mostly followed this guide, with some modifications.

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Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub

The bag I went with is called a Musette bag. Most military surplus shops sell them for $15-$20. They’re shaped and sized like a messenger bag except for one key difference: they have two adjustable backpack-style straps that clip onto D-rings. This is important to attaching them to the bike.

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Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub

I cut some corruplast backs and bottoms for the bags to add structure and keep them from sagging against the wheel and exhaust. I also hit the bags with some commercially available waterproofing spray.

Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub

The bags are suspended from the bike by threading them up and over and clipping them to each others’ D-rings. One could also loop them back through and clip them to themselves but this way felt more solid.

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Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub

Next up is some nylon straps to keep the bags located. A roll of webbing and bag of tri-glides (that’s what those slidey plastic things are called!) cost me $15. I secured the straps to the tri-glides with pop rivets but one could also sew/glue/whatever. After you cut it to length you just run the end over a lighter to keep it from fraying.

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Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub
Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub
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The straps secure the bags to the rear pegs and around the back of the bike to each other. This creates tension to keep the bags from flapping in the wind.

Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub
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Tah-dah! We’ve created some snazzy retro-looking bags that match the bike nicely. Now it’s ready for trips to the grocery and post office and whatnot. Total supplies cost was about $60, which is literally nothing compared to buying some ready-made bags.

Illustration for article titled I crafted some saddlebags for the Cub

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