It was a banner year at EAA AirVenture 2015 and one of the best I’ve experienced in my 20+ years of attending.

Below are a few of my favorites out of the 400+pictures I took. I’m not exactly thrilled at how many of them turned out. The filter I (stupidly) used on many of the later ones is too saturated and it didn’t really come across until I had dumped them from my iPhone to my computer. Also, I played around with manual focus more than usual and it resulted in a number of the images being slightly out of focus. Oh well, that’s what I get for using a potato and not more serious equipment. Live and learn.

Anyway, on to the photos...

My lede image: the world’s only airworthy Consolidated Vultee PB4Y-2 Privateer. Hopefully more restoration is in store as she was pretty bare and a little rough.

Warbirds

(captions are below the subject image)

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A beautifully restored B-25 from the Texas Flying Legends

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Immaculate Goodyear FG-1D Corsair

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P-40K Aleutian Tiger

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The Allison V-12 in the P-40. One of the exhaust outlets looks to be missing.

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An actual Mitsubishi A6M2 “Zero”. Very rare.

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This C-47 was slated to be rebuilt as a Basler Turboprop conversion until someone did some research and discovered that it had participated in D-Day and a number of subsequent European operations. It’s currently being fully restored to WWII condition.

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A DeHavilland Mosquito. Made mostly of wood, there is only ~250lbs of non-engine metal in the whole plane.

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The instructions on the Mosquito look to be hand-painted.

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A row of B-25s

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A beautifully restored Douglas A-26 Invader

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The P-51D Sierra Sue. She is unique in that she has been restored to authentic “new” condition. That means that she looks as she would have when she rolled out of the factory, not necessarily in perfect shape like many restorations.

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An example of the authenticity of the restoration. These are the markings that would have been on the aluminium from the supplier, Alcoa.

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A Spanish-built HA-1112, which was a licensed version of the German BF-109. This one has been made to look like a -109, but with a Rolls-Royce Merlin instead of the Daimler-Benz 605A.

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An incredible P-51B. The level of perfection on this was staggering.

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A field of Mustangs. Somewhere around 15-20 were at Oshkosh.

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The Hun. I never thought I’d get to see an F-100 Super Sabre fly. This thing is amazing.

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The USAF spared this F-4 from drone duty long enough to fly it up to Oshkosh. Since she’s slated to be blown up sometime soon, she was in pretty rough shape.

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Grumman TBM Avenger painted to look like the one former President George H.W. Bush flew in WWII.

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The Privateer. I didn’t even know one of these still existed, let alone that it was airworthy. This one flew many years as a water bomber after WWII.

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The world’s only (for the moment) flying B-29, Fifi.

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The C-47 was positioned perfectly for some great twilight shots.

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A list of all of the operations that the C-47 took part in. It would have been a travesty if she’d been converted to a turboprop.

Modern Stuff

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A Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier

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This Harrier is well-worn.

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The Harrier during its vertical-flight demo. Always fun.

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The F-22 Raptor. Only the 3rd time it’s been to Oshkosh.

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The mighty B-52H. This was her first (and possibly only) visit to Oshkosh. Special accommodations had to be made to make room for her to land.

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The BUFF’s bicycle-style main gear.

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Look closely. The B-52 crew jokingly asked for a homebuilt aircraft award application card.

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This Pruis dwarfed by the tail of the B-52 struck me as beautifully ironic.

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The F-35 making its Oshkosh and civilian airshow debut. She’s bigger than she looks in pictures.

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The F-22 and F-35 were at AirVenture for almost the whole week and had a 24-hour guard of USAF reservists with loaded M4 carbines and Beretta 9mm sidearms. They were super nice and willing to talk, though.

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B-52 with the Goodyear blimp Wingfoot One in the distance.

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The F-22/-35 being guarded and lit-up made for some nice photo ops after the night airshow.

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Cars/Other

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Saw this immaculate GMC Typhoon on the way up. It had a very loud turbo, which sounded awesome.

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An Honor Flight that took off from AirVenture earlier in the day gets sprayed by the water cannons upon return.

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The new Raptor in the Ford tent.

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Following the tradition of making special edition Mustang to be auctioned off, Ford made the Apollo Mustang. It was signed by members of the Apollo 13 mission (included Gene Kranz) and sold for ~$230,000.

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The new GT. It was a PITA to photograph with the dim lighting and black wheels.

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GT350. Sadly, I didn’t hear it run.

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Funny story. The face detection on my camera apparently thought the tail lights looked like faces.

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Model T rides

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I don’t know which organization owns this or what it is (looks like an Oshkosh truck chassis), but it is huge.

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Those are all skydivers. A world record was set on Friday for largest formation dive with 108 participants.

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EAA stretch Beetle with a trashcan in the hood.

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The Lincoln Continental concept.

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Focus RS

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Underneath the Raptor.

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