I've already dumped a bunch of photos from the Ellerslie show a month or so back: here's the rest. The rest of the possibly vaguely interesting ones, at least: there's a bunch more which I won't inflict on you.

So anyway, I left you with some Lotii, and we pick up again with more Britishness: XJ220 - woohoo!!! This was the big "surprise and delight" moment of the show for me - I've held these in awe since the work of the Saturday Club became industry rumour, I've never actually seen one in the flesh, and I didn't even know there was one in NZ.

Conclusions, having drooled at it for an excessive length of time:

  1. That is one big-ass car. Wide, looong, and low. I've always known that, but it's impressively true in the flesh.
  2. Pretty, very, very pretty. And very, very Jag. Nice to see some of the design cues from the 60s showing here, and some of the cues from this in the F type.
  3. Glass engine cover: BAD idea. Just rubs your face in the lack of V12. And the V6 is not an elegant lump even as V6s go.
  4. ME WANT. ME WANT LOT!!!!

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Next stage, though the "department of oddities" heading towards the sound of someone revving heck out of a smallbore V12.

Oddity #1: DKW "Munga" 4WD. Excellent name. Apparently these were the German postwar equivalent of the Jeep or Landie. Distinctly strange looking even as small 4WDs go. And did I mention that Munga's an excellent name? All small strange mudpluggers should be called Munga.

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Oddity #2: Jensen SV8. The output of the short-lived Jensen revival in the early 2000s, only 20 were ever made, according to Wikipedia. Can't imagine why....

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Oddity #3: the right way to show a Beetle

Arrivign at the sound of V12s, I am immediately distracted by something cooler. Which means sorry, no Ferrari photos, try here.

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My dream garage:

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I was initially disappointed to find the Stratos and 037 were replicas. Then amazed to see how good they were. Then fascinated to hear the story (which has since gone viral). And now you can buy one :-).

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And just across the way another replica. I've always liked the 3-box era Fiats, and this replica of Walter Rohrl's WRC-winning 131 Abarth ticks all the boxes.

Down the back of the stands, past a sea of 1970s-coloured Toranas,

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...and we're back into oddities:

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...and not-so-oddities.

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Then back outside, and into Ford country. A seelction of Escort rally weapons of various eras, and the 900lb gorilla of early Australian muscle cars, an XY Falcon GTHO (for the non-Australasians, "HO" stands for "Homologation": you work it out).

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..and then into the "European oddballs" section. A surprising selection of the less exotic Bugattis (if such a phrase is valid), a good spread of Citroens (chopping the top off a Traction makes it look suspiciously like a German staff car, even in red), and some pretty little Alpines.

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..and speaking of oddballs, Subaru have always been able to play with the best.

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No, that's not a 512BB, yes, that is a cardboard roof. Definitely in the "road hard and put away wet" class - seen on the Sports Car Club of NZ stand, which as you can see is not a rich man's car club.

The TVR club has already elicited a rant, so I'll say no more.

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Gymkhana going on in the car park - I arrived just as the cloud of smoke from Mustang vs Vette settled, in time to watch the sublime and the ridiculous. One of these cars is more suited to tight manouevres than the other. Though the Jag's just a little non-stock - it held up pretty well.

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..and finally, out via the Mogs. Spot the decal theme? The kill stickers are on a factory special Plus 4 with race bits and a 300hp Ford Zetec engine; I imagine the dead Germans were in 911s.

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