Like the manual transmission the number of V8 engines is rapidly shrinking, to the point it may disappear some day. So lets have a look at what V8s are available today in the home of the brave V8, the USA.

First off it's the non luxury cars (lets say sub~$60k). The good 'ol pony car trio are still representing V8s just fine. The Dodge Charger and low volume Chevy SS are keeping the V8 sedan alive and well, no more Chrysler 300 V8 though. Interesting Hyundai and Kia are now representing the V8 better than a lot of other companies.

Ford Mustang - $32k - 435hp
Dodge Challenger - $32k - 375hp+
Dodge Charger - $33k - 370hp+
Chevrolet Camaro - $34k - 426hp+
Chevrolet SS (Super Sport) - $46k - 415hp
Chrysler 300 $45k
Hyundai Genesis - $51k - 420hp
Chevrolet Corvette - $53k - 455hp+
Kia K900 - $54k - 420hp
Hyundai Equus - $62k - 429hp

For entry level sports sedan/coupes Lexus, Mercedes and Audi still offer NA V8s. It seems likely that all of them will move to turbo V6s next generation, or possibly turbo V8s. BMW and Cadillac are going the route of turbo 6s and if Infiniti ever gets into the game they will too.

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Lexus RC F - $62k - 467hp
Mercedes C63 AMG - $63k - 451hp
Cadillac CTS-V coupe - $71k - 556hp
Audi RS5 - $71k - 450hp



Midsize luxury cars used to be champions of V8s. Today however, the crowd is getting thinned. Mercedes seems to be phasing out the 550 models (no 550 sedans), leaving only the AMG with eight cylinders. You wont find a V8 in a Cadillac CTS or Lexus GS, but both will have one in their upcoming performance models (CTS-V and GS-F).

Mercedes E550 coupe/63 AMG - $60k - 402hp
Infiniti Q70 - $63k - 420hp
Audi S6 - $71k - 450hp
BMW 550/M5 - $73k - 443hp
Jaguar XF/XFR - $73k - 470hp
Mercedes CLS - $73k
Audi S7/RS7- $84k
BMW 650/M6 - $97k

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Full size luxury is an eight cylinder stronghold, and likely will be for years to come.

Lexus LS460 - $73k
Audi A8/S8 - $90k
Mercedes S - $94k
BMW 750 - $95k
Jaguar XJ/XJR - $97k
Porsche Panamera - $114k
Maserati Quattroporte - $144

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The number of V8 sports and supercars actually seems to be growing, possibly at the cost of V10 and V12 cars.

Aston Martin Vantage
Audi R8
Bentley Continental/Flying Spur
Bentley Mulsanne
Ferrari California
Ferrari 458
Jaguar F Type
Maserait Gran Turismo
McLaren 650S
McLaren P1
Mercedes SLK 55 AMG
Mercedes SL
Mercedes AMG GT
Porsche 918

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How about engines with more than eight cylinders? It's a pretty small pool. For deca-cylinder vehicles there's the iconic Viper and the VAG cousins. I'm thinking it's only a matter of time before the R8 replaces the V10 with a turbo eight.

Dodge Viper
Audi R8
Lamborghini Huracan

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There's still a handful of twelve cylinder cars roaming the land.

Aston Martin V12 Vantage

Aston Martin DB9
Aston Martin Vanquish
Audi A8
BMW 760
Ferrari FF
Ferrari F12
Ferrari LaFerrari
Bentley Continental/Flying Spur
Lamborghini Aventador
Mercedes S
Mercedes SL
Aston Martin Rapide

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This list is cars only, no trucks/suvs/cuvs, because I think that's more interesting. I've left off boutique manufacturers, the kind of car makers who sell less than 20 units per year in the states. Notable examples: Morgan, Nobel, Koenigsegg, Pagani, Bugatti, Hennessey, etc. So what did I miss? what's inaccurate?