Great video showing a 1928 Trojan van. The Trojan car was an extremely unorthodox design with a long history. Designed in the 1910's, WWI meant the start of production was delayed for several years. By the time Trojans started hitting the streets they were peculiarly outdated. Mid-engined and solid tired, the cars featured chain drive, and a Ford Model T style epicyclic gearbox.

The fuel tank and carburetor were under the bonnet - whereas the engine and gearbox were located under the front seat. The intake manifold was three feet long. Low speed torque? Gobs of it. Throttle response? Eventually.

The engine was a “duplex” 2-stroke design, originated by the Trojan’s designer Leslie Hounsfield, but much better known for as the “Twingle” for its much later use in Puch motorcycles. Basically, two cylinders share a common combustion chamber, and the corresponding pistons share a common V shaped connecting rod (that bends!).

Although not a huge seller, the Trojan van was produced with few updates for decades, although with each revision it became increasingly less eccentric. The final version ditched the weird 2-stroke engines and epicyclic gears for a more conventional gearbox and diesel power.

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