Technical innovation is what makes Formula 1 so different from any other form of racing. The on track action is as much played out by the engineers and aerodynamicists as it is the drivers. We are here to admire, study, and discuss this beauty that exists on the ragged edge of what we think is possible, or at least what we thought was possible.

For more technical intrigue, be sure to check out this year's previous testing days.

Discussions and questions are welcomed and encouraged in the comments section below.

Testing Day 7 - Bahrain


Red Bull

Advertisement

Red Bull Flow-Vis testing the front wing with Daniel Ricciardo; separately from the sidepod testing seen below.

Advertisement

Advertisement

RB10 rear end detail.

Advertisement

Shown here is the carbon S-duct that the Red Bull team uses to duct air from underneath the nose to the top side. For a better explanation that I can give, read Craig Scarborough's article.

Mercedes

Advertisement

Mercedes have implemented a two-into-1 wishbone on their front suspension.

Also note the turing vane underneath the nose; it looks like a complicated multi-element connected vane, rather than just a curved carbon sheet. The flat bottom section exists to separate the air and not allow air from the top to slip down underneath the vane; keeping it under control of the main elements.

Advertisement

W05 rear-end detail.

Ferrari

Advertisement

Ferrari are running some interesting pitot-tube arrays just in front of the rear wing; these exist to measure how the air is approaching the underside of the rear wing.

Advertisement

Lotus

Yup.

Advertisement

Lotus pitot tube testing the E22.

McLaren

Advertisement

The flow-vis on the Mp4-29 interestingly flows down the rear of the sidepod, not inward as you may have imagined. I can't say with certainty why this is the case, but I believe the combination of the vortex generators located at the front of the sidepods and the low pressure from the coke-bottle zone is helping.

Advertisement

McLaren still running the Wishbone Wings (or as I like to call them, Shroomspension) that created quite a stir in Jerez three weeks ago. The MP4-29 also sports an elongated gurney-style flap on the top of the diffuser to help and create more of an upwash behind the clever suspension.

Advertisement

Sauber

C33 steering wheel. I think I count four separate paddles.

Advertisement

Sauber C33 rear end detail.

Toro Rosso

Advertisement

Toro Rosso rear end detail.

Williams

Advertisement

The Williams FW36 is without a rear wing supporting pylon on the centerline.

Caterham

Advertisement

Ct05 rear end detail.


[Select images from Somers F1, F1Technical.net, and @ScarbsF1]