Technical innovation is what makes Formula 1 so different from any other form of racing. The on track action is as much played out by the engineers and aerodynamicists as it is the drivers. We are here to admire, study, and discuss this beauty that exists on the ragged edge of what we think is possible, or at least what we thought was possible.

Discussions and questions are welcomed and encouraged in the comments section below.

Testing - Jerez, Spain

Red Bull

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RB10 rear end detail.

The RB10 chassis is sporting a single central rear wing support that is mounted from the top of their engine cover bodywork, instead of going all the way down to the floor like other teams.

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Red Bull have retained their flow modifiers/voracity generators despite the lack of a coanda-style exhaust.

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The outlet for Red Bull's 'S-Duct' can be seen exiting the top of the nose, just before the bulkhead separation; the inlet is just below, on the underside of the nose.

Ferrari

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Ferrari utilizing flow-viz paint on the front of their F14T, both on the nose, and on their front wing. this paint will flow with the air moving around the car and give the engineers a better understanding of how their aerodynamic parts are working around a circuit that computer and wind-tunnel models just can't quite replicate.

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F14T rear-end detail.

Mercedes

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Note the looped diffuser strake on the centerline of the W05 chassis; each team run different rear diffuser configurations.

Also note the W05's lack of rear cooling vents relative to the Toro Rosso chassis below.

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McLaren

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McLaren may be the keeper of a certain silver bullet (2014's double diffuser, blown diffuser, coanda exhaust, f-duct, etc). See if you can sort out what it is in the pictures below, before clicking the link.

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Toro Rosso

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Toro Rosso is one of the teams to utilize a Y75 winglet (aka monkey seat) above their exhaust outlet to try and flow the gasses up toward the underside of the rear wing. The blue and yellow stickers on the underside and supports of the monkey seat measure temperature; this way the team will make sure the carbon doesn't deform or melt.

Sauber

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Sauber seem to have a relatively minimal front wing on their C33 chassis, as least for font-downforce sake.

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C33 rear-end detail. the top of the diffuser looks to support some sort of gurney flap, though I can't be certain on the bodywork's purpose.

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These new LED lights adorn all of the new 2014 chassis. Green means that the electrical systems are okay, and it is safe to approach the car. Red means that the electrical systems are in some sort of hazard, and it is not safe to approach the car in a normal fashion.

Force India

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VJM07 rear-end detail. Force India also run a Y75 winglet, though the design supports only 1 element.

Williams

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If you look closely enough, multi-element wing mirrors can be made out on the FW36 chassis.

Notice the undercut on the sidepod of the Williams chassis for routing the maximum amount of air back toward the top of the rear diffuser..

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Caterham

The CT05 runs possibly the biggest sidepod inlets of the entire f1 paddock.

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CT05 nose and front-wing detail. I am worried about the lift the underside of the thicker section of the Caterham's nose creates.

CT05 rear-end detail.

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CT05 rear-end detail.

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Caterham have made the switch to pull-rod style suspension.

[Select images from Somers F1, F1 Fanatic, and Craig Scarborough]