Hi everyone! Long time lurker and now first time poster. I drive a 2013 Cadillac CTS-V Sedan (6MT, of course), owned since new and my first non-BMW after 5x 3ers (2x E46 330i, 1x E90 335i and 2x E90 M3).

I have a thread about my car on Final Gear’s Post Your Car section, but since the BBC “takedown” and then the new forum software, discussion seems to dwindle. I don’t really care about viewership numbers, but more feedback will be more fun :-) So, I applied here, got approved, and here I am!

If you want to catch up, feel free to peruse the thread here:

My “thing” is tackling Destination Highways here in Beautiful British Columbia, and coming back with photos and GoPro videos. Also, this CTS-V2 is the first car I’ve owned out of warranty, so I’ve started to make changes. Finally, I’m still a member of the BMW Car Club of BC (hey, this Cadillac is more “BMW” than most recent BMWs), so I will also provide some BMW content.


With that out of the way, now for a real post. I recently had my exhaust fully done, and I wanted to record some footage. So, last Saturday I did a 1 day trip to visit the tunnels of Fraser Canyon.

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First stop was at Hope, the start and end of the loop, to sort the camera and microphone placements.

Right away, I got what I came for. Traffic was light, so I was able to go through the tunnels at my... uh... “leisure” :-D

Full video of this section here:

Then, I got to Lytton. As the confluence of the Fraser (which I followed to get here) and the Thompson (which I will follow next) rivers, it is one of the earliest non-native settlements in the Southern Interior.

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He waved and asked for a pic, so I took one

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Year Built: 1912

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Close-up of the microphone setup. It is a Rode Video Mic Go. For the videos through the tunnels, I did not put on the “muff”, and thus the sounds were “blown” :-(

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From Lytton, I got back onto Highway 1, which now follows the Thompson. First, though, had to wait out the train:

This bit of Highway 1 gets right down on the river, and ducks underneath the Canadian National Railway tracks at several places. Full video here:

Now, Spences Bridge. Here, I leave Highway 1 for Highway 8 (Nicola Highway), which is highly recommended in the Destination Highways book (it is #9). While here, I pulled over next to the tracks and across from the Inn for some pictures.

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...plus, I have to cross the tracks for one last time just ahead, so might as well wait here for the train to finish passing.

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Here is the Nicola Highway, so named because it follows the Nicola River, in full:

That brought me to Merritt, the “country music capital of Canada”.

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Year Built: 1908

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Arms of Canada on the side of Canada Post building: A Mari usque ad Mare = “from sea to sea”
Merritt is a major road junction in BC’s south interior. BC-5-S to Hope, BC-5-N and -5A-N to Kamloops, BC-5A-S to Princeton, BC-97C-N to Logan Lake, and BC-97C-E to Kelowna.

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After these pics, I proceeded through downtown Merritt...

...to get to Coldwater Road, another listed Destination Highway. As captioned above, Merritt is the junction of 6 major provincial highways, and here I am leaving town using none of them ;-)

Coldwater Road runs parallel to the Coquihalla Highway (BC-5), and eventually merges back into it. The “Coq”itself is not bad... it is well-engineered and so can be done at quite a speed (speed limit = 110km/h). It is also the direct route from the Lower Mainland to Kamloops and then onto the rest of Canada, and thus it is favoured by truckers... and also is one of the highest elevation of any major highway in Canada. Hence, featured in the TV show Highway Thru Hell.

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Here is me going through the Great Bear Snowshed:

And, a full video of this stretch:

Just beyond Hope, I turned onto Highway 3 (Crowsnest Highway) for a little bit:

...to visit Hope Slide, the second largest landslide ever recorded in Canada. I usually get here late, so to be able to see it in the full sun this time was a bit of a treat. 47 million cubic meters came down, the road is now 55m higher, and 2 people and a yellow Chevy convertible are forever below.

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Here, the “loop” ended, so I packed up the GoPro and the microphone and headed home.