If your Ford had a Matthew McConaughey, it would be a Lincoln

Flight 93 National Memorial

Started at first as a local effort, the memorial for the passengers and crew who died on Flight 93 on September 11, 2001 eventually became a National Memorial as part of the National Park Service. I took these photos during two separate visits to the memorial, before the visitor’s center had been completed. Shanksville is in a beautiful, rural part of southwestern Pennsylvania in Somerset County, not far from where my father was born.

Advertisement
From the parking lot, you must walk a long, zig-zagging path to the memorial wall. This pathway gives you time to contemplate what you will see at the end.
Along the way are niches in the wall. Visitors leave tokens often whatever they happen to have. These items are collected and cataloged by the National Park Service.
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Memorial Wall is aligned with the path of Flight 93 as it struck the ground. At the end of the Wall is a large, rough-hewn wooden gate.
Looking through the gate you see the flight path mowed into the field. Just before the tree line, a boulder marks the point of impact.
Advertisement
The boulder which marks the point where Flight 93 impacted the ground.
The names of the 37 passengers and seven crew members are etched on the Memorial Wall. In the background is the uncompleted visitor’s center.
Advertisement
“and unborn child”
The visitor’s center
Advertisement
Advertisement

All photos ©Tim Shaffer

Share This Story