A wall divides the cities of San Diego and Tijuana.... but despite San Diegonians getting all of our shitty water, we getting their CARB air, and both living near a fault, we don’t share most things... one of those is cars.

Think about it this way, were it not for the border, a trip from San Diego to Tijuana would take, at most 20-30 minutes, but since there’s a border, it takes closer to an hour. While I don’t mind that and each country must live their migratory truths, why do this to cars?

I mean look at these precious little things:

Those are sold here with EU approved engines, and running on the MQB platform found in the Golf.

Think about that, these cars are more than qualified to pass Federal regulators in the US (as petrol engines at least) and less than two miles from the border there’s a VW dealer that will gladly sell you either, thses also come with

I know Americans don’t like small cars, it’s the stereotype that has been told for years in marketing meetings, but we have these just two miles away! If the Golf passed federal regulations and it’s sold in the US with similar if not identical engines to these cars, why not certify these cars and have them as perhaps a special model? Sure, we have them with KM/H in the dash but that’s probably the least of the problems. It’s not a case like Citroen that would need new infrastructure in the country and import the cars through the sea; we make the many of the parts for these cars, their engines and we already import them through the port of Veracruz in the case of the SEATs. How hard and expensive is it to federalize a car?

How much money would VW make by selling these cars? I mean, not as a showroom model, as a specialty model of sorts for the niches of internet peoples who like these cars? I remember a certain scheme to import grey market GTRs was making money before the Feds shut it down.... these are NAFTA cars in many respects, we shuffle them around all the time!

So what gives?