Getting to know the Jag

Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag

I put the Jag up on jack stands and spent the afternoon getting to know it better. The bonded and riveted aluminium (said in the wrong British manner) chassis construction is neat. Aside from the front and rear sub frames, there is very little steel on this car. Some things like a lined, sound deadened transmission tunnel on the exterior warmed my heart to see.

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While the engine is indeed Ford’s 2.0 ecoboost (Jag’s own turbo 4 wouldn’t be ready for prime time until the next production year), it was interesting to see things like the accessory drive scheme and routing that are bespoke to JLR.

Poking around revealed some interesting things learned about it. Chief among them was that the blokes have clearly spent some time studying ze Germans. Many aspects of the mechanic components and construction have a very Baviarian feel to them, albeit with execution that isn’t always quiet as clever. Given how small an automaker JLR is, I consider it a forgivable sin. There are also some neat details like dual hood latches.

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Some of the details like 12 torx head bolts to open the air filter housing raised an eyebrow, but at least the blokes were nice enough to make them captive. Lots of newer cars these days manage to let you change filters without tools, but not here. I did like seeing the OEM JLR air filter is made by Wix, so my Wix replacement felt like just cutting out the middle man.

Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag
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It also got 6ish quarts of fresh oil and a new filter along with the tires rotated. Under the car, the German study continued. Almost the entire underside is covered with interlocking covers to control airflow that only go on and off in a particular order, very much like the Bavarians do it. Unlike ze good Bavarians, there is no access for routine service. Access to the oil drain plug and filter require removing the entire large panel covering the whole powertrain held on with 22 bolts. This should be familiar to late model Audi wrench turners.

The fsm books an oil and filter change at 1.2 hrs of labor. I’m going to guess a dealer probably charges about $200 for an oil change on one these (after the free maintenance period for 5 years/60k) , and they surprisingly wouldn’t be ripping off a customer to do so.

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Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag
Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag
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Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag

The next Jaag project was some new rear brakes. At 54k, the rear pads were at about 20%. After double checking the fsm for the magic combination of button presses and holds to put the electronic parking brake actuators into service mode without a fancier diagnostic tool than I own, the rest of the brake job proceeds pretty much as standard.

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Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag

The usual German car be careful with the brake pad wear sensor also applies here, especially since once set the dtc warning can only be cleared with a fairly high-level scan tool that speaks late model JLR. I don’t own such a scan tool.

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Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag
Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag
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Always lube your slide pins...

Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag
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I even bothered to put the vanity cover back over the engine before bedding in the pads.

Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag
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Illustration for article titled Getting to know the Jag

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