Illustration for article titled Got Into the Sim Scene
Illustration for article titled Got Into the Sim Scene
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After countless excuses of not enough time or money, I finally put together a decent sim rig. The biggest roadblock for me always was the price. A decent wheel and pedals go anywhere from $300-$500, a good table or mount is another $200-$300, and a comfy enough seat is upwards around $100.

That is, until my friend sent me this:

Illustration for article titled Got Into the Sim Scene
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Illustration for article titled Got Into the Sim Scene

A little less than 30ft of 2” PVC piping, a handful of joints, some spare plywood sheets I had lying around, and a lot of use out of my new Rigid reciprocating saw yielded me a strong enough frame to hold my plus-sized self. I reinforced most of the connections with corner and mending braces after a few trial runs of the joints coming apart mid drive. A lot of the screws, nuts, and bolts used were ones I had in my dedicated loose bits drawer. That saved some money and time

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The seat is out of a 2010 Fiesta base model. The local junkyard had the care for barely a week when I came across it. Seat was already unbolted from the car, just sitting there waiting to be taken to a new home.

All together, the materials cost $115, the wheel and pedals were $300 open box on eBay since they’re sold out everywhere else, and the seat was a whopping $30. $450 for a complete setup is a lot less than if I bought everything new. My next improvements is to fix some faster wheels on the front end to help move this when needed otherwise it’s a two-person operation

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Currently, I’ve tried it out on games such as Forza 7, Forza Horizon 4, F1 2019, NASCAR Heat 4, and Project Cars 2. Each one a whole different animal to tame from the other. So far, F1 and NASCAR are the most easy to dive right in to. The others will need tons of seat time and calibrations.

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