The whole idea of heritage is marketing wank.

It’s about glorifying what was to add perceived value to what is. It’s a scam, to make more money from the same product.

Porsche is a big offender, and an easy target. Look at the “718". Is it a revival of a classic design? Is the latest Boxster a world class racing car because it carries the name? That’s the implication. They’re using the 718 name because they know that Porsche buyers will spend money if they think a car is historically significant. The range has gone through standard-fare downsizing to 4 cylinders, and the marketers have gone digging for something to use to make this sound important.

NASCAR is another example. All racing is. There’s a “Camry” racing in Nascar - it literally has nothing in common with the FWD road-going Camry. But they’re trying to convince you otherwise, to make sales. In this case it’s not even history, it’s just giving something the same name and praying.

Look, look the longtail is back! Throw us money!

This is the quote that started this article, from here:

The fact they’re still independent and run by a Zagato family member means Ugo’s original vision and ethos are still very much intact

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Really? Ugo died in 1968 - how much of “his vision” is present in modern day Zagato? Even if the current board has someone sharing his name and “blood”? The idea of family in humans suggests that there’s some link. In practice, there is not. Ugo’s grandchild could decide he wants to do something completely different - is it still Ugo’s Zagato then?

The last Bugatti died in 1939 and the company changed hands a number of times. Does that mean the EB110 or Veyron are somehow not in the same “ethos”?

Does it mean anything at all?

Look at the new Mitsubishi Eclipse SUV thing. It’s a very different car to what an “Eclipse” is, but they’ve named it such to cash in on whatever credence that brand had.

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Ferrari are the same. Every car is a new car, but every car carries some silly old name from the past. Superfast or California. But, despite using the same basic V12 design since the original Muira, Lamborghini don’t do this so much. Each car is a step forward, without digging up the past to make them something they aren’t. The Huracan is the Huracan, a different beast to the preceding Gallardo.

Look, look the speedster is back! Throw us money!

Food for though. Next time Porsche promise that a special edition 911, with some stripes and a different rear wing, has roots in the past: think twice.