Piaggio Apes wrapped in tubular frames and beef'd up engines create a quite interesting way to kill oneself while going sideways, as this post proves.

This tubular trycicles could be turned from cheap transportation into cheap dirt-sliding so easy, that I started thinking them as the cheap, no frills, sports-car they could have been.

Sure, Lotus 7s really were forefathers of Ariel Atoms, and, well, Piaggios are Italian, which is not Britain, by the way. But whereas the Lotus 7s were cheap sportscars by sportscar standards, they didn't sell that cheap, and were quite regular cars, in shape and construction, by the time they became Caterhams. These quirky things, on the other hand, were built by the dozen and had lots of spares and room for improvement.

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In a nation where the same company would evolve in 20 years from building egg-shaped Isettas to 400 h.p. Grifos, well, they could have managed to create something like this and sell it in reasonable numbers, at least until FIAT 600-based Abarths stole the show.

Thus, this is how a three-wheeled one-seater italian cargo van is the spiritual forefather of a four-wheeled british kit-car. Or maybe it isn't at all, but who cares?