This is a platform for User Generated Content. G/O Media assumes no liability for content posted by Kinja users to this platform.

I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed

This is the plastic Torch’s Changli should have been made out of.

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

But how did I get here? Well, first, you take the door and windows off the old rotten wood playhouse/shed that has a 5-foot tall entrance that you always band your head on:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Then remove the ‘siding’ and insulation (whatever’s left that the mice, bird, ants, wasps, whatever have been munching on):

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Then the walls come a tumblin’ down:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Inside as well, where you find not only a HORNETS NEST (abandoned, thank the Lort), but the scribbles of kids names, some tic-tac-toe games hidden behind the inner plywood walls, and of course scratch marks made by the vermin that made the walls their home:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

GARTH? Must have been a 90's kid.

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Once all the insulation is removed, you find that a porcupine built the damn thing. I probably have 73.6 pounds of nails in all these 2X4's I saved for other projects:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Once ALL the walls have been removed....

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

You cut off the roof (image not available because heavy and dicey even when cut in half to be removed) and think for a few minutes how to bring the rest of the floppy structure down... then you just YANK:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Once you remove all THAT , you’re left with the perfect level base for a new shed floor!

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

And a SHIT TON of wood:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Okay, NOW we can start putting the new shed into place, first with the floor pieces:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Then you decide to work smarter and not harder, and bring as many pieces of the new shed out from the garage and across the yard as possible:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Meanwhile sending the scrap wood you are NOT keeping to reuse to the firepit:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Then you start putting up some of those walls:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Windows and doors:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

And finally the roof:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Then you admire all the newfound room for all your crap:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

And put the crap in:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

It literally feels like a roomy port-a-potty inside. Just a new one, that hasn’t been pooed in yet. Kinda dark, kinda warm, kinda plasticky smelling. While exploring those sensations, I noticed its not QUITE air tight (there are screened vents on the walls up near the side windows). I saw some light poking from the corners that could easily let bugs in. Not wanting to let that happen (again) I used leftover butyl from sealing in the windows that came with the ‘kit’ and squished it into all the gaps I found. Basically all four corners, and where braces on the roof went through the walls there was light/air/bug gaps.

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

(nevermind the writing, I did some pre-assembly in the garage and this made it easier to identify which steps I could skip later)

Another issue I faced was the CHEAP plastic nuts that snapped into the panels that the screws were to thread in. They expand when the screw is run into them, tightening their grip on the panel and allowing them to be forced to mate with the panel being attached to them. Well, some of them started to spin in their holes, no matter how carefully I screwed or how much I spread them before snapping them in. And both the nuts and the holes are oval shaped... but still they’d spin. Some I was able to carefully massage screws into, others I had to shove a washer in the gap to keep them from spinning. Which did NOT work on the ones that were hidden. I wasted too much time on those, especially when I dropped one in the dirt. You’d THINK they’d send a few extra but NOPE. I had to find it:

Illustration for article titled I Built A Port-A-Potty Shed
Advertisement

Other than that I have no gripes. Well, maybe the fact that there’s no info on this shed anywhere online, even Lifetime’s website. Or Costco’s, the store we bought it from. I’d love to leave a review, or read others.... I took a chance and it worked out I guess.

I’m going to put up some solar powered lights with motion sensors to illuminate the inside and out, since the slightly tinted windows do not let enough light in late in the day, and I have some work to do on the foundation. And oh yeah, that ramp. I have to figure out something better for that. It works, but its not ideal.

Advertisement

That’s a project for another day. Now that I got my garage back, again, maybe I’ll work on the Trans Am a bit...

Share This Story

Get our newsletter