The years long import Wars appear to be at an end, but the global car community isn't out of the woods yet.

The agreed upon peace talks between the US, Britain, and Japan begin as scheduled. Japan's representative Smokey Nagata unfortunately was arrested due to his decision to travel to the event by turnpike in his famous V12 Supra at 200mph in protest of us import laws. The president has already agreed to commute his sentence, but the Japanese royal family has sent signals that this may not be sufficient to bring them back to the table, as they suffered heavier losses than anyone during the 90s import embargoes set by the US.

As a show of good faith, Prince William - Representing Britain of course - traveled to the talks via traditional air transport channels, forgoing the use of the family private jet. It is widely hoped by everyone in his camp that this will make the Obama administration more likely to legalize the import of the TVR Sagaris to the US. It appears though, that it will not be that easy.

"So after hearing that loudmouth on Top Gear take a dump on everything the US stands for, we're supposed to just open our borders again?" Asked the US secretary of transportation days ahead of the talks. "To a British car, no less? You're kidding, right?" The administration has somewhat dismissed the comments as 'of the cuff', but it's likely that Clarkson will remain a sticking point during negotiations.

The royals have been working to mitigate the Clarkson issue. Years before, the Top Gear team were given free Visas for their expedition across the US. Even though Chrysler refused to sponsor the event with the use of a review car, the event was seen as a positive step forward, but a lot of people felt that Clarkson's subsequent roasting of the C6Z06 erased a lot of goodwill. He has recently changed his hard-line against American cars with the C7, stating it to be "excellent". This displeased British fans of the abrasive car critic, who alledge him to be on the take with the royal family. Clarkson has declined to comment for this article. Even if the talks go smoothly, it is widely believed that we are still decades away from an end to the import Wars, and decades more will need to pass before the legislation spawned by that era is repealed.