Previously, I covered the classic "long nose" 911 of 1963 to the impact bumper G-Series of 1974. In this segment of the generational comparison, I'll be comparing the 964 previous G-Series. As before, I'll be dealing with their first years(1974 and 1989 respectively), and coupes only to keep things simple and tidy.

(For anyone questioning why the sudden large post and why I'm still here, I couldn't leave you all behind and not finish what I've started, so I'm staying and I'm gonna finish this to the end no matter what!)

964(1989)

Classic modernity

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In a post a very long time ago, I made an argument that the 964 was the best looking 911 ever, but it kinda went everywhere; the looks and the mechanics and how it was the one to buy. Now I'm actually going to explain properly.

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1989 was the first complete makeover for the 911 and Porsche did it right. They kept the classic shape but changed some minor and major things. To start off, the most notable change from the G-Series was the use of more integrated and aerodynamic polyurethane bumpers; giving the 911 the more streamlined shape that it's 1st gen. ancestor had 25 years prior. I will also note, that as with the previous generation, the turn signals and fogs(if you have/had them) are still integrated into the bumper.

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The other major change was an electronically controlled rear spoiler positioned where the rear air vent was/is located; a vent with more purpose!

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Now I now I said that I wouldn't get technical with this series, but this is a crucial fact; so allow me to go off on a long tangent. In 1989, the only 911 available was the new all-wheel drive Carrera 4. Now with modern 911s(the 997 and 991 most notably), the most distinguishable difference between the two is the width of the rear fenders. I'll cover this more later, but essentially, if you had a C2 it was narrower in the rear compared to the C4. In the 964's case, there was no difference in the width of the rear; they were all narrow bodied, unless it was a Turbo. However, the rear flares were slightly more pronounced than in the 1974 car. The 964 was the last generation to have the "original" narrow body design.

(1975 Porsche 930)

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(3.2 Carrera Speedster "Widebody")

The widebody look originally began with the 930 Turbo, which needed bigger flares in the back to conceal the bigger tires in the rear. With the introduction of the 3.2 Carrera in 1984, buyers had the option of having the iconic "Turbo-look" from the factory, coded as M491.

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The final exterior changes were very minor. The side skirts became more pronounced and the rear reflector changed it's shape slightly. The reflector maintained the "PORSCHE" lettering , but was less noticeable; the letters having only their outline and the reflector being "redded out".

Among the things that stayed the same for the 964, the location of the fuel door, the elephant ear side mirrors(of which there are two), most of the body panels as well; the doors and their windows. And if I remember right(I may have to go back and check my books) the panels for the roofline and headlights may have remained; after all, Porsche claimed the 964 to be 85% new.

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The interior wasn't really anything new, but rather full of even better electronics and creature comforts. You had some actual diagnostic lights within the gauges(see the faded rectangles in gauge second to the left), Power seats, an improved AC and heating system, a new shifting housing that contained some electronic features for the car, and finally, a steering wheel-mounted airbag! But it's a racecar........

The interior was what you would expect from a 911. You have to remember that Porsche is all about evolution rather than revolution, and the 911 is he embodiment of that virtue, inside and out.

Now for some good looking pictures:

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Fun Fact:

Along with the makeover to the 964, was the changing of the "911" from it's boxy 70s font, to a more italicized and edgy font; at the same time, it was also standardized on all Porsches(save for the 928 and 944) from then on and is still used today!

From this:

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To this:

That's all for this segment of the generational comparison! Next time, we will take a look at the 993, and how it compares to the 964.

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Hope you all enjoyed this one.