This week-end was a blast! Awesome people, nice cars, and a lot of perfect driving roads.

However, on day 2 of the Alpine drive, the Mégane showed it’s anger via a check engine light and a request to check the injection. It doesn’t throw an error code though. A quick Google search told me bad fuel will do that.

I refueled it with 98 octane as soon as available and drove home. Light still on. Disconnecting the battery didn’t help. I bought an injector cleaner and refueled with 100 octane. Hoping it will forget it.

[Edit]
Apparently, it wasn’t the fuel, after driving around for a while with the injector cleaner, the check engine light was still glowing at my face, so I took my parents Crossgolf again (what a great purchase) and my mom took the car to Renault, since my OBD reader didn’t find anything.
They plugged it to their computer, which told them it was a faulty pressure sensor in the air intake. They ordered it, got it in the afternoon, installed it, test drove it for 20 minutes (according to the bill). No more light and 300€ gone.
While I’m happy the car is alright again, there are some points I didn’t get:
- Why does the car tell me to check the Injection if an intake air pressure sensor has an issue?
- Why doesn’t my OBD reader, and also the WAY more expensive computer my dad has (Gutmann Mega Macs) find an error code?
- Why does Renault’s computer find it?
- Why does it take 20 minutes to change a sensor that is on top of a pipe at the front of the car, which doesn’t even require to remove the engine cover?
- How can Renault get away with asking 135€ for the same brand sensor you can get for around 50€ on the net?
- Why does it require a 20 minute test drive when just starting the car would have told them that the light doesn’t go on again?
- Why did my mom give them the ok to do the repair when I could have just paid for the diagnosis, taken the car back and changed the sensor myself?

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Anyway. I’m going to an Alpine / Renault Sport event this weekend. Might put a sign on the car.