What would any red-blooded, GM loving, car enthusiast with over 200 vintage muscle do? Buy on old Walmart and charge likewise enthusiastic people to view your pristine collection of running condition Corvettes and Camaros with a spattering of Pontiac and Oldsmobile. Did I mention Corvettes?

If you need to kill a rainy afternoon in southwest Florida, then I'd recommend heading to Muscle Car City and perusing the 99,000 square foot facility. That's what I did last week when I risked life and limb to venture a trip to the sunshine state. Rick Treworgy has been buying, restoring, and selling old cars to support his car collecting hobby. After 40 years of turning his dream into a reality and stock piling well over 200 vintage '50s to early '70s muscle cars, he's acquired quite possibly the largest collection of GM muscle cars in the nation.

If you're into fast Fords, or more about Mopar, the $12 price of entry might be a little steep for an hours worth of looking around a huge room of cars. If you love Corvettes, and appreciate a nice big Chevy V8, then I suggest you check it out. The museum is holding its first Annual Gulf Coast Classic Collector Car Auction in April, which means now is a great time to visit since dozens of extra cars have been stuffed in every available space to be sold to the highest bidder.

This isn't your typical car show quality, but mint condition museum cars. Here are just a few of my favorite example from a simply massive collection of some of the nicest example of GM muscle I've ever seen. Here's the entire album if you'd like to see more.

Advertisement

The entrance looks like your entering a Walmart, and there's not much else to give you hints at what's inside. I expected an elderly man to greet me as I went in the doors. The lobby has the original retail customer service counter turned ticket taking register, and a quaint 50's themed diner was bustling with patrons. A large partition divided the room blocking any peek of the cars waiting on the other side.

Advertisement

After walking through the museum doors you're greeted by this beautiful pre V8 C1, and you're jaw will drop as you look up and see four more rows of Corvettes.

This 1975 C3 Stingray was the last year for the convertible which wouldn't return for 11 more years.

Advertisement

The original Stingray, this '63 split window looks untouched and completely original. It even comes with some grease still on the motor.

Advertisement

The only modified car in the place is a second 1963 split window with a 500hp LS3 and independent rear suspension from a C6 Corvette.

Advertisement

No Vette collection would be complete without a brilliant red C7 flanked by rows of more Corvettes spanning over 40 years.

Who doesn't love the massive fins and rocket ship tail lights of the 1960 Impala?

Advertisement

My personal favorite, and childhood dream car was this '69 Chevelle SS 396.

Advertisement

You Smokey And The Bandit fans wouldn't be disappointed. There were two Pontiac Firebirds sporting the iconic flaming Phoenix.

The perimeter was littered with vintage automobile paraphernalia including this miniature hand-made Bugatti replica.

Advertisement

Wagon aficionados will be delighted with the half dozen Chevy Bel Air long roofs in assorted model years and colors. This one had surprisingly wide rear tires.

Advertisement

Here's a stunning '41 Special Deluxe Coupe that came with a fascinating Firestone Car Cooler automobile evaporative conditioner.

This quintessential car/truck mashup was made in 1959, the first year for the El Camino. It was accompanied by six more 'Caminos in a variety of body styles.

Advertisement

This classic Suburban has made friends with another 1957 that came with the first production four-wheel-drive.

Advertisement

Oldsmobile representing with a Hurst/Olds pace car from the Indy 500 in 1972.

Here's an orange Goat.

Instead of dumping you out into a traditional gift shop like most museums, you are routed through a makeshift showroom with a handful of cars for sale. Then instead of rows of chincy trinkets from China, you are offered a selection of parts from the Hot Rod Speed Shop.

Advertisement

Speaking of Pontiacs and pace cars, this 1984 American, mid-engine Fiero also served as pace car at the Indianapolis Speedway. It can be yours for a mere $14,000.

Advertisement

A numbers matching '67 Corvette convertible is also for sale at a low low discounted price.

While the Muscle Car City might be a one and done destination, I thoroughly enjoyed myself and appreciated the high quality collection of cars.