• Eh, b’y (also spelled ‘Aye b’y’ and ‘ay b’y’, and sometimes said as ‘yes b’y): shortened form of “yes, boy.” It’s a term used to agree with what someone is saying.[11] Can be used sarcastically.
  • Yes, b’y: Yes boy. It is an expression of awe or disbelief. Also commonly used sarcastically to mean yeah right. It is similar to “eh, b’y.”
  • Where ya at?: Where are you?
  • Stay where you’re to/at till I comes where ya’re at/to.: Wait there for me
  • Get on the go: Let’s go. It’s also, a common euphemism for partying. on the go by itself can also refer to a relationship - similar to a dating stage, but more hazy. The term also refers to drinking (“gettin on the go tonight” - going out drinking tonight)
  • Havin’ a time: having fun [12]
  • You knows yourself: Responding to statement in agreement.
  • What are ye at?, or Wadda ya’at b’y?: What are you doing?
  • Wah?: what?
  • Luh!: Look!
  • G’wan b’y!: Literally, “go on, b’y/boy?” Can be used as a term of disbelief or as sarcasm, like the term “No, really?”
  • Hows you gettin’ on, cocky?: “How are you today?”
  • You’re a nice kind young feller: “You are a nice person”
  • Me Son: a term of endearment, like “my friend” or “my bud.”
  • Me ol’ cock: another term of endearment like “my friend,” “me son,” or “my bud.”
  • You’re some crooked: You are grouchy
  • He[she/dey] just took off:, They left recently/quickly. Whether or not it denotes time depends on use of the word “just;” by not including “just” denotes speed, whereas using “just” denotes time.
  • Mudder or me mudder: mother
  • Fadder or me fadder: father
  • Contrary: Difficult to get along with.
  • After: “have.” For example, “I’m after sitting down” for “I have sat down.” it is also used like “trying” (i.e.: whaddya after doin’ now?, “what have you done?”)
  • Puttin’in: Referring to young women, from “putting in”[citation needed]
  • Oh me nerves: an expression of annoyance
  • Ducky: female friend or relative, used affectionately.
  • My love: female friend or relative
  • My treasure: female friend or relative. These three terms are used platonically.
  • Scopie: a nickname of a bottom feeding fish often found around coves —specifically, Sculpin.
  • Rimmed/Warped: to be deformed or distorted in an unusable fashion. Often used to describe someone who is seen upon as weird or an outcast (i.e., She’s rimmed, b’y).
  • Right: synonym for “very;” i.e.: “She’s right pretty.”
  • Scrob/Scrawb: a scratch on one’s skin (i.e.: “The cat gave me some scrob, b’y” falling into disuse in lieu of scratch)
  • Gets on/Getting on, used to refer to how a person or group behaves (i.e. “You knows how da b’ys gets on” / “How’s she getting on?”)
  • On the go, To have something processing (“I’ve got an application on the go”) or be in a relationship (“He’s got some missus on the go”)
  • Tits up in the rhubarb!: falling over, tripping, passing out (due to intoxication)