So as you all know, I was in the market for a replacement car... and I was recently tempted by a 2005 Volvo V50:

Well, I didn’t buy the Volvo. Instead, I bought a 2005 Ford Focus Wagon:

Including the safety certification, e-test and tax, it’s costing me just under CAD$2000 (which is about US$1500). It has 235,000km, runs well, has a good set of winter tires currently installed (will have to buy a set of wheels/tires for the summer... which I can get cheap at car-part.com), no leaks and the dealer will service the brakes and a few other minor items (needed to get the safety certification).

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I also have some leftover spare parts from my last Focus that I could use with this one... so that’s an added bonus.

Unlike my last Focus (which was a fully loaded ZXW SES), this one is a basic ZXW SE... meaning it has wind up windows, manual rear view mirrors, cloth seats (which I actually prefer), no sunroof (which I prefer), unpainted door handles/mirrors and no tachometer (BOOOOO!). Still has A/C, a decent stereo, a cargo cover, a manual transmission and a Mazda-based engine that uses a timing chain that never needs to be replaced.

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The only issue it has that I’ll have to fix is the wiring that goes into the rear hatch door. It’s a common issue with the 2005-2007 Focus hatch/wagon. The wiring cracks and causes the rear wiper and 3rd brake light to work intermittently. It can also cause blown fuses.

I could get the dealer to fix that section of wiring, but I still have wiring left from when I fixed this on my last Focus. And I’ve seen how dealers “fix” this specific issue... either with poorly placed splices or charging $$$ by replacing that section of OEM wiring harness which will have the same issue because it’s overpriced cheap crap with not enough slack.

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I’d rather fix it myself in a proper way that will ensure it stays fixed (involves cutting out the bad wire, splicing in new wire and have the splices done in a way that they are not in a spot where they’re subject to bending). It’s a cheap fix... it just takes longer to do it right.

Assuming some incompetent driver doesn’t smash into my car AGAIN (as has happened to my 2 previous cars), I expect my new-old Focus will last me at least 3 years... and probably as much as 5 years.