In the land of the automotive enthusiast, power is a funny thing. You want more, so you buy more. You're complacent. Then you're no longer complacent. So you buy more mods.

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What a circle. The thing with turbo cars is the bang-for-the-buck with simple bolt-ons is hard to beat. A $1000 exhaust and $500 tune can net 30% or more power in some cases. And since it's the rush of torque that is measured on the butt dyno, it's instantly gratifying.

With my BMW M3 there wasn't much more torque to be had but you sure can get that bastard to pull hard on the top end after a few breathability mods. Top end meaning 6000 to 8200 RPM, of course. The problem with this, for me at least, was that the M3 was my daily driver and as such I was rarely in that part of the power band so the power mods I did went mostly unnoticed. Not the best way to drop $2,500. Get headers, they said. You'll love it, they said. Nope. Most regrettable purchase of 2013. Maybe even the most regrettable mod I've ever done, short of the shocker sticker.

Photo by David Wong

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Knowing that I may eat my words later, I'll say it anyway. With my WRX, I think I'd be happy with about 300 horsepower to the ground. Should be achievable with a catted J-Pipe (downpipe to the rest of you), intake and tune. The turbo is small so if I want more it's much larger dollars. Deterrent enough.

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And my WRX is a daily driver and it must stay reliable. I have zero intention of drag racing. In fact when I commute I'm almost always in the slow lane. I keep the digital display on the vacuum/boost gauge and try my hardest not to go in to positive pressure in hopes of better fuel economy. My rational is I'm conserving fuel so when I can so that I can hoon around later and not feel bad. God, I might be a dumb ass, after all. Can't be the only one, right?

//Follow me on Twitter: @JoshTaylorUSA