A handheld radar/photometric scanner for optimizing the garment industry’s sizing and patterning processes.

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Worked for over a year on this one; conference calls every Wednesday night with Philly, Vancouver, SoCal, Taiwan, and China. Got to the point of being ready to pull the trigger for tooling, then the client pulled the plug.

Illustration for article titled Quarantimes: Products That Never Made It Out
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Illustration for article titled Quarantimes: Products That Never Made It Out

Some Dell micro-desktop PCs from 2007, what later became the Studio Hybrid.

Back in 2007/8, I led a program with Flextronics to do gaming desktops, all-in-ones, and small form factor desktops. Super, super fun program. All cancelled during the financial crisis of 2008.

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Illustration for article titled Quarantimes: Products That Never Made It Out
Illustration for article titled Quarantimes: Products That Never Made It Out
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Here’s a functional prototype done for Microsoft, back in 2005, for the 2006 CES show. Microsoft was showing their UMPC concept; we designed and built a few docking concepts for them, and this one we actually built for Ballmer to show on stage.

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Here’s a couple wearable 3-D holographic display concepts from 2014, for Leia (who partnered with RED cameras):

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Illustration for article titled Quarantimes: Products That Never Made It Out

2009: Dell Studio

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Electric-car charger, 2014:

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I still want one.

Here’s a thin client small notebook concept for AMD, back in 2006.

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By no means close to an exhaustive list— when you work in the industrial design consulting business, probably 98% of the work you do ends up in the trash can, or disappeared in some closet in a giant corporate HQ. Every once in a while, though, something comes through. When you’re really lucky, it might even come out like you’d hoped or intended.

Hope y’all are doing all right.

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