Apparently I fell asleep last night without posting an QOTN. Sorry about that, folks; I got off work late and wound up going almost straight to bed after getting home.

One thing that’s long been a fascination of mine is the difference in offerings between the U.S. Domestic Market (USDM) and other markets where a lot of the same worldwide automakers compete, like Europe, Australia, and Southeastern Asia. Here in the U.S., we looooooove our big, brawny pickups, but in Europe a lot of the same work done by pickups here is done by vans, so there’s a wide array of vans to choose from in all sorts of shapes and sizes. In Australia, they appreciate RWD, so there’s still a holdout for mainline brands making their flagship sedan RWD (Ford and Holden - GM’s Australia-based brand - most notably), whereas in the U.S. it’s mostly FWD (but with an arguable resurgence thanks to the Dodge Charger and Chrysler 300 twins, which are essentially old Mercedes sedans, leading to the chevy ss, as well as rumors of a RWD Mustang-platform-based fullsize vehicle to replace the Taurus and MKS, though the Continental Concept being AWD might squash that rumor). In Asia and Australia they also appreciate trucks, but on a slightly smaller scale. The list goes on and on, but there are differences for a reason, but at the same time, I can’t help but think that having semi-universal offerings across the globe wouldn’t be such a bad thing, if international and federal laws would allow for it.

So the QOTN tonight is, what do you think is the biggest gap in our North American vehicular lineup?

For me, it’s RWD body-on-frame smaller pickups and SUVs based off them, like the Ranger and Everest, or the Tacoma and 4Runner. The offerings we have here are fairly dated (though gm and Toyota would have us believe otherwise), or nonexistent in Ford (and VAG, FCA, and Hyundai/Kia’s case, for now?). But they’re trucks, which outsell everything else here for now, and they’re honestly capable ones at that.

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I want these to be available here. Badge the Ranger as an F-100 to have it help the F-Series’ sales numbers, and the Everest is a logical competitor to the 4Runner, but not as large and potentially unwieldy as an Expedition. While we’re at it, give us the Territory and Falcon too.

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