I really enjoy watching automotive and racing videos on YouTube and Vimeo. As each day goes by they get better and better. Channels like Petrolicious, /Drive, ElectricFederal, The Aficionado, Jay Leno, and the list goes on. The quality is near cinematic in some cases. Matt Farah and the crew did a video showing what it takes to capture these pieces and it is not a trivial matter. But I'm no snob, I'll watch Jim Bob Joe's videos too if it comes up in a search for something I'm looking to learn about a particular subject.

Last night I came across a video by Sean Senatore. He goes by "CrashnBurn1984." The shoe might just fit. Mr. Senatore owns a very nice BMW X3 i35 Xdrive. We are looking for such a vehicle and some of the standard reviews are nearly infomercials vs a look at the car and the capabilities it presents.

Mr. Senatore starts off showing the car's exterior and interior. Pretty standard, though perhaps he might consider cleaning the interior first. His X3 has the M-Sport package and some really nice seats, albeit with crumbs all over and scattered crap. This criticism isn't really the heart of the matter, though. The real deal comes when he starts driving. Alone. You know, one camera man, presenter, and driver all wrapped up into a tidy package of potential Road Warrioresque mayhem.

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So, let's get this thing on the road. The whole crew of one should do the trick. He goes on to speed in public, at least I'm guessing 77 mph is speeding in New York on a surface street, right? My favorite is when he flies around a corner regaling the viewer with how well balanced the X3 is, but I'm not worried about the car. I'm worried about the bicyclist to his right as he barrels down the road at 72 mph indicated on the X3's nifty Heads Up Display.

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Seventy-two miles per hour is nothing folks. Wait until he hits 120 mph indicated, on his speedometer, you know with the camera in his hand, negotiating a new corner. Did I mention 120 mph? On a New York surface street?

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I hate to be so critical because Mr. Senatore seems like a genuinely nice guy. He's passionate about his car and he has a touching story of how he lost his X5 in Hurricane Sandy, replacing it with the X3. However, I wish he would restrict his "testing" to closed road-courses and perhaps invest in a Go-Pro or two and get a friend to handle operating the cameras. Skim through the video and tell me where I'm wrong. I was actually pretty surprised to see no mention of his risky behavior in the comments section, only praise for the great video.