Or you buy one because awesome.

The startup scene in San Francisco is pretty nuts sometimes. Just the other day, I was on the subway, and one guy was telling another guy about his startup and complaining about how the marketing guys would not get going until they had an actual product to sell. Wow, the attitude on those guys. I really felt bad for him.

A more relevant story here is Leap. They want(ed) to “fix” public transit by running luxury buses between a few areas of San Francisco and the financial district. Their solution is simple: a coffee bar and roomier, comfier seats so you don’t have to brush up against other humans on your way to your angel investor meeting. Not sure about their messaging on bringing community back to the city by moving the rich to a separate transit system, but I may be wrong. More details here.

It seems they’ve run into a bit of regulatory trouble, and are currently on hold. The man is keeping them down.

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Oh, and now, they (or the man) are selling off three of their buses, and this is where you come in!

Can you not totally see yourself in this seat? Be honest, you have all wanted to, ever since you first took a bus out of suburbia as a punk kid.

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Seriously, can you say party bus? Or mobile head office for your very own startup? How about the most epic road-trip vehicle to go bring all of your friends/involuntary pit-crew to the track?

Just look at this interior!

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A fridge. In a wall. On a bus! How could your friends stay mad at you for forcing them to change brake pads and fix coolant leaks all weekend?

Seriously, Doug, you just have to buy this as your new vehicle. You could then hyper-mile your Hummer behind it like a boss, and then hyper-mile your Nissan Stanza behind that. Then park it on your street, and prove it is not as wide as a soccer-mom’s SUV.

Again people, they are selling three (3!) of these. Three! Spec race series?

Don’t thank me, I do it for the children.

Source: Ars Technica

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Image sources: Ars Technica and First Capitol Auction.