In response to the notes left on everyone's doors yesterday that any car parked in the outside parking lots at my apartment complex is considered "abandoned" it sits in the same spot over 48 hours and will be towed, I left a voicemail for my cantankerous apartment manager asking if I could give her my vehicle info so I don't have to keep moving my not-at-all abandoned Jeep that's my 2nd car and I mostly drive in the winter to avoid it being towed.

She called me back this morning, it did not go well.

I asked about the part of the note that says to let the management company know if you're going on vacation so your car doesn't get towed. If they're already keeping track of cars not to tow, can't they just not tow mine?

She got bitchy with me right away, saying "well that's just temporary exceptions, I can't give YOU special treatment when everyone else has to follow the rules."

I tried to explain that I'm not asking for special treatment, and why can't they just have a list of cars that are resident-owned so they don't get towed?

She spent all this time ranting about how the parking lots are for residents and guests to use, not for storing cars, and that I should have known about this when I signed my lease. Which was 4 years ago, when I only had 1 car, which I parked in my building's garage not out in the outside lot.

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She also kept saying "I don't want to argue about this" and then arguing with me more.

Finally I got so pissed at her and said "You know what? Fuck off," and hung up.

So, once I start driving my BMW most of the time and not the Jeep, I'm going to have to take Squid's suggestion and I'm printing out a stack of notes that says:

This vehicle is owned by an (apartment complex) resident. It is fully functional and not abandoned. It was last moved to a new space on _____. It has permanent 4wd.

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If this vehicle is towed before ____, or is damaged in any way due to improper towing of a 4wd vehicle, (apartment complex) will be held liable for all towing charges and repair costs.