Illustration for article titled My Honda Cub is too a real motorcycle gt;:(

And I’ll tell you why. It has nothing to do with top speed or wheel size or any other way that most jurisdictions define the scooter/motorcycle distinction.

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Illustration for article titled My Honda Cub is too a real motorcycle gt;:(

Look closely at the engine. See where it’s mounted? It’s rigidly bolted to the frame. That’s a motorcycle thing. The cub also has foot pegs and foot operated controls rather than a simple footrest platform, but this is just a general motorcycle trait rather than a hard-and-fast rule.

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Illustration for article titled My Honda Cub is too a real motorcycle gt;:(

Vehicles we recognize as scooters, like this Vespa, have their engine mounted either to the wheel or swing arm. The engine is part of the sprung weight and is rigid in relation to the wheel, not the frame.

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Illustration for article titled My Honda Cub is too a real motorcycle gt;:(

There are naturally plenty of genre-bending two wheeled conveyances, but most are easily sortable into either category. The Cub, of course, is a step through design despite otherwise being built like a motorcycle. Meanwhile, this Dong Feng here is styled like a sport bike yet has the aforementioned swing arm mounted engine.

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Illustration for article titled My Honda Cub is too a real motorcycle gt;:(

Then there’s the Suzuki Bergman, which has what appears to be a swing arm mounted to the engine, which is in turn mounted rigidly to the frame. I think that still falls squarely under “scooter” though.

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Illustration for article titled My Honda Cub is too a real motorcycle gt;:(

In conclusion, stop calling my Super Cub a scooter. Thank you for coming to my TED talk.

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