This car needs no introduction, and I’m sure you all know the story behind the BC already. (before you ask, yes this is the Geneva car).

It’s not everyday you wake up knowing you’re going to be shooting a $2.5 million dollar car, let alone two very special Paganis in the same month. When a car that’s captivated the hearts of millions rolls through your hometown, you just don’t pass on the opportunity to see it - even if it means waking up stupid early on a Saturday.

As you can imagine, this car has been all over the world and similarly photographed by countless very talented people. I’m not sure how long the BC will be staying in Toronto, only that it will be leaving very soon to head south for the Pebble Beach Concours at the end of August. Actually, this isn’t the first time the car has been on North American soils as it was present for a shoot in New York some months ago with Richard Thompson; I highly recommend you watch the video from Phase One before proceeding because the images from a medium-format camera (read: very, very expensive) are simply mind-boggling.

The BC, short for Benny Caiolo, is a very limited variant of the already high-performance Huayra coupe. Of the 20 units planned, this car bears serial no. 1 with two (three?) more in varying stages of completion back in Italy. It had actually arrived at Pfaff Pagani earlier that week, and several others made the trip down to Canada’s exclusive Pagani dealership.

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I, of course, was not so lucky as it just so happened to be raining on the morning of, which meant 0% chance they’d be willing to roll the car outdoors. Not that I’m complaining because it forced me to get up close and personal with my photos!

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Despite the lighting, it was quite an enjoyable and quiet morning. The showroom was pretty much empty, which meant I had plenty of time to slowly work my way around the car with my two lenses.

While there were no other people to deal with (other than the extremely friendly Pfaff staff), the cars proved to be less co-operative. Despite asking politely, this Scuderia refused to move over and kept getting in the way. Though, I guess this is one of few circumstances where you’d be frustrated by the presence of a Scud.

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One of the biggest challenges was probably just the work area in general - not big enough to make use of long primes yet not an ideal environment for a wide-angle zoom, nor physical space to get the best angles. This is pretty much what I was working with:

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The next half hour was a mix of getting lucky and creative with the lighting.

But the more time I spent with the BC, the more details I started noticing. For example, how the LED strips blend seamlessly with the carbon canards.

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Or the different blends of carbon fibre around the exhausts, as well as the BC engraving on the exhaust itself.

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Or even how the semi-metallic, semi-matte paint transitions to gloss exposed carbon.

While I wasn’t able to open the doors, you can still (thankfully) get a clear view at the interior as is.

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The blue-leather cabin looks as pristine as when it left San Cesario sul Panaro, and extends to the exterior body panel latches. (I imagine the fitted luggage as well)

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The wheels, which also carry the cursive BC engraving, are a better design (in my opinion) than the original Huayra items, but the carbon brakes remain unchanged.

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As Pfaff’s own demo Huayra, and the first one I’ve ever laid my eyes on, is all carbon (pictured above in diecast form), I had a slight idea of what to expect but I was still taken aback with the BC. The Pagani emblem looks a tad lost in that ocean of weave.

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On the topic of carbon, here’s another look at the wing.

And one of the most photographed parts of the car.

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And the entire rear end of the car.

The rear deck features that symmetrical yet artistic weave that all Paganis are known for.

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The shape of the rear deck, if you could call it that, appears as it it would follow the principles behind McLaren’s size-zero policy.

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And with that my time with the BC came to an end. It’s a very special car and I’m blessed with the opportunity to have gotten so close to it, knowing full well I’ll probably never see it again.

At the time of writing I’m still lost for words. If you’ve made it this far, I hope you’ve enjoyed! I’ll be off shooting something equally special but of a completely different origin in a few days so stay tuned to this space for that; until then, I will be posting another short piece over at LALD.

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Special thanks to a good friend for his assistance in proofreading.