Victor Lundy was studying to be an architect in 1942 when he joined the US Army, hoping to help rebuild Europe after the war. Instead, he got sent to France as a soldier for the D-Day landings. Lundy carried sketchbooks with him throughout basic training and deployment, and used his Hardtmuth lead pencil to sketch the scenes around him. His sketchbooks now reside in the Library of Congress.

In our modern era of digital photography, where the lens and memory card capture even the finest details of a scene, there is something remarkable about how these sketches, often just the barest outlines, convey even more information and emotion than a photograph. The viewer is left to fill in the blank spaces with our own imaginings, while the artist points us to what is important in a scene. Even a sketch of a sleeping soldier has life and depth.

Lundy returned to the US and opened his own architecture firm in Florida, where he became one of the leaders of the Sarasota School of modern architecture before relocating to Houston.

You can see more of his WWII sketches here.

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Victor Lundy