The story of the 1939-1940 GM "Ghost Cars"

Illustration for article titled The story of the 1939-1940 GM Ghost Cars

I’m going to go out on a limb and say that these were probably some of the greatest if not the greatest show cars ever. The World’s Fair was coming up, and the chemical company Rohm & Haas had just developed Plexiglass. When thinking up ways to showcase this new invention, they came up with the crazy idea of building a transparent car. From there, they made a partnership with General Motors and it was decided that two transparent cars would be built based on the design of a Pontiac Deluxe Six. General Motors then gave Rohm & Haas the factory blueprints for the body of the car, and Rohm & Haas proceeded to perfectly recreate all of the Pontiac’s body panels in Plexiglass. The same steel support structure that is found in the original Pontiac’s body is still there, so the Plexiglass acts as a window so you can see how the car is constructed, and all of the trim pieces (and tires) were made either white or chrome while certain mechanical parts were painted copper. All in all, these cars ended up costing $25,000 to build, which was quite a lot at the time, but the finished vehicles looked insane, earning them the nickname “The Ghost Car”. After the World’s Fair, the Ghost Cars toured various Pontiac dealerships until eventually being sold. Only one of them is known to survive, but it still looks just as fantastic today as it did then.

Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The story of the 1939-1940 GM Ghost Cars
Okay so maybe its not in perfect condition today, but the fact that it still exists at all is awesome.
Okay so maybe its not in perfect condition today, but the fact that it still exists at all is awesome.
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled The story of the 1939-1940 GM Ghost Cars
this car is not ideal for kidnapping...
this car is not ideal for kidnapping...

Share This Story

Get our newsletter