And here's my one-stop roundup of all the Renault Twingo tests that are actually important. Or, you could spend all day waiting for other sites to parse it out to you one test at a time. Isn't your time more important?

So what did the British Journaille think of the innovative French* rear engine, rear wheel drive little shopper?

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Whatcar? "resolutely unremarkable to drive, barring its impressive turning circle"

AutoExpress "Yes it may have a rear-engine rear drive set up like a Porsche 911, but don't go thinking this makes it in anyway sporty because this little Renault lacks the fun factor of a VW up! or a Hyundai i10."

Autocar "Despite its resolutely ordinary set-up [...] the Twingo has some country road potential."

Topgear "There's no oversteer. A non-switchable ESP is like some overzealous H&S officer in a hi-vis. But the layout still has advantages. The light nose means it's super-agile down twisty roads. The steering isn't corrupted by torque demands, so feels very pure."

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My take: we'll have to wait a bit longer for the pocket hoon mobile we were all hoping for. A warm/hot version is clearly in the works, but they're figuring out how to do it. According to Autocar, bigger four cylinders simply won't fit, so they need to see whether the tce 90 engine can be tuned beyond 120 hp safely. If it can't, it'll be a "GT", if it can, it'll be a proper "RS"

The versions out now are focused on city car use: great packaging, super agile, and a driving set up to mimic as closely as possible the FF hatches that all of their customers will be familiar with. Can't argue with that.

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I'm also wondering whether the fancy trim and engine tested by everyone here does it no favours. More than one tester complained about turbo lag, high price and unnatural feel from the variable rate power steering. Maybe driving the snot out of the unblown, conventionally steered base model is actually more fun. Won't be the first French* econobox for which that is true...

*on a shared German platform, made in Slovenia