As it sits, FCA is the world’s eighth largest automaker, holding the rights to ten automakers, and various other aftermarket subsidiaries along the way. If you ask me, they’re a modern day British Leyland, filled with multiple struggles and cases of company in-fighting between different models, but that’s really a different story for another day. Nevertheless, as inspired by Opponaut Kai Wai Wong’s look at different Chevrolet models produced around the world, let’s take a look and see just how many cars has gracefully produced for us. Trust me, there’s plenty of pickings for every man.

Note: This list includes upcoming models that may not yet be released to the public, but have been unveiled/officially announced.

Abarth

Abarth is technically classified by FCA and Wikipedia as its own marque, even though their main trade is spicing up already existing Fiat models. Whatever, apples and oranges, and all that...

Abarth 500/500C

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The Abarth 500 stands strong as Abarth’s (undoubted) strongest seller and the car that largely started it all for the United States. The hot pocket rocket stays largely unchanged for 2019, albeit with a few appearance upgrades here and there.

Abarth 124 Spider

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The Abarth 124 seems to be the darling of Oppokin alike with its peppy and sportier approach to the Miata formula we love so much. 2018 was a big year for the 124, with a GT model joining the ranks for a more raw, race-tuned approach, so 2019 is a largely dormant year for changes to the 124.

Abarth 595

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In Europe, the regular Abarth 500 has been replaced with the all-new Abarth 595, which makes up a huge chunk of the range apart from the aforementioned 124 Spider. The 595 range is made up of five models ranging from the entry-level 595 to the enthusiast-oriented 595 Pista, so EuroOppos can rejoice knowing that there’s truly a 595 for every walk of life.

Alfa Romeo

Alfa, as we all know, is my favorite brand that FCA offers. I could wax poetic all day about soul and design, but I’ll spare you the details for today. However, I was saddened to see that Alfa Romeo only offers four models across the globe, I definitely feel like a brand like this should be extending their tendrils to all markets. Baby steps, I suppose.

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Alfa Romeo Giulietta

With an overall design dating back to 2010, this generation of Giulietta’s days are probably numbered. There have been some rumors of a replacement, though, so don’t think the model’s fight is over quite yet. For those in the right market, you can pick up a Quadrifoglio Verde model with 237 bhp mated to the 4C’s DCT gearbox which adds up to a quick little machine. How I wish I could buy one here...

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Alfa Romeo 4C

You can rest easy, as the car that (thankfully) brought Alfa back to the states is still alive for one more year. However, 2019 doesn’t roll around without its casualties, as the 4C Coupe is lost for the new year. But, I’m sure we all don’t mind getting some wind in our hair, no?

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Alfa Romeo Giulia

Oh my absolute darling, you’ve survived your first full year on sale in the states. For 2019, Alfa Romeo brings on a new Sport Carbon package for the Ti models, giving a more aggressive, Quadrifoglio-esque look. Speaking of the mack daddy, the QV remains largely unchanged for 2019, which is good, cause you don’t really wanna mess around with perfection.

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Alfa Romeo Stelvio

Alfa’s new sales leader also gets to stick around for 2019 (obviously). Sales for the regular Stelvio and Quadrifoglio seem to be steadily climbing, meaning that Alfa could be here for a long time if their cards are played right. Changes for 2019 include the aforementioned Sport Carbon package for Ti models, similar to the Giulia.

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Chrysler

It’s a shock to me that Chrysler is even still around. With only two models sold worldwide, it definitely feels like their days have been numbered for quite some time. A far cry from the fifteen or so models they had under their belt only 15 years ago...but I digress.

Chrysler 300

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The 300 is one of the final few classic American luxury cars. Boasting big power, big comfort, and a RWD platform, it’s no wonder why its popular with its increasingly dwindling market. And that’s where the problem lies. While people do still seek out the 300 next to its competitors, its aging engineering and chassis means that its days are numbered, and I doubt that it’ll last much longer than 2019. For the new year, the 300 stays largely unchanged, apart from a few new wheel selections for the lower end 300 and Touring models.

Chrysler Pacifica

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The Pacifica is probably the one reason why Chrysler is hanging on so long. If FCA retooled this to be a Dodge, Fiat, or anything else, Chrysler would be done. Nevertheless, the Pacifica is here, and it is a very competent minivan. For 2019, an aggressive S model is added to the regular Pacifica and Pacifica hybrid models, featuring a blacked out package. You know, for the sporty soccer moms in your life...?

Dodge

The “brotherhood of muscle” is going nowhere anytime soon, and that’s a good thing. No one else does a one-finger salute better than FCA’s blue-collar brand, and I feel like that’s a healthy mindset to keep in today’s world. So, you’d be understandably surprised to find that three of their cars are numb little compacts sold in overseas markets. Bear with me.

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Dodge Attitude

You may be looking at the Dodge Attitude and thinking “that looks mighty familiar.” That’s because it is mighty familiar. You know the Attitude as the Mitsubishi Mirage G4 in the states. This badge engineering job is a Central American market wonder that seems to be a little ironic considering the name its been given.

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Dodge Vision

The Vision is another Mexican-market wonder that lives its life in other countries as the Fiat Siena. It’s another badge engineering slob-job. I have nothing else to say as there’s not much information I can find about it.

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Dodge Neon

Neon fans rejoice - the Neon is alive and well! At least...in the Middle East (and Mexico...again). The Fiat Tipo-based wonder is apparently a pretty competent little compact, and has a lot of people clamoring for a United States entry. While that’s still to be seen, the Neon can be yours if you see yourself traveling to the aforementioned countries anytime soon, so you better get to ticket shopping.

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Dodge Charger

Finally, some familiar territory. The Charger is a fan-favorite with so many people it isn’t even remotely funny. Taking Dodge’s “everything is a muscle car” ideology and running with it full swing, the Charger is a powerhouse of “f*ck you” to everyone who stands in its way. For 2019, it receives some minor updates, with high-performance models such as the SRT and Scatpack receiving some Hellcat-style treatments on the exterior. Buyers of the less impressive V6 GT AWD models can now opt for an SRT bodykit if you want to flex on Instagram.

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Dodge Challenger

The Challenger to the Charger is like peanut butter to jelly. You can’t talk about one without mentioning the other, and its easy to understand why: both cars share platforms and trims pretty closely...that is until you reach the higher end of the Challenger spectrum. The bulky coupe shares the Charger’s SE, SXT, GT, R/T, SRT, and SRT Hellcat trims, but for 2019, the Challenger adds the addition of an all-new Hellcat Redeye version, with a 90 hp bonus over the aforementioned Hellcat. Somehow, this bloody behemoth won’t die, but you don’t hear me complaining. Keep on shredding that Star Spangled Banner, Dodge.

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Dodge Journey

From a car that I hope sticks around forever to a car that I wish would die immediately, we reach the runt of Dodge’s lineup: the Journey. The Journey, unfortunately, has its place in the market, as the cheapest CUV on sale with a standard third-row of seats, for those low-credit families of the world. 2019 marks the end of the SXT model, with the base SE gaining a few new standard features to fill the gap. But, please, if you are looking for something in this segment, look elsewhere...you’ll thank me later.

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Dodge Durango

Much like the rest of the lineup, the Durango is yet another old hit in the slew of Dodge’s discography. With its aggressive lines and vast comfort for a slim price, it’s basically a bigger Journey in terms of how popular it is in the CUV world. But, unlike a lot of other CUVs, it, thankfully, has a bit of a hot-blooded bone in its body, with the addition of the SRT model last year bringing it to the eye of many enthusiasts. For the new year, the GT model adds a functional SRT hood, the SRT gets new brakes, and all models get new safety technologies as an option.

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Dodge Grand Caravan

Somehow the Grand Caravan is still alive. Go figure. I suppose just like the Journey, it caters to an audience that can’t exactly afford the latest and greatest. That’s fine, I suppose. In all regards, it’s essentially the same Grand Caravan we’ve had for years, with no major changes for 2019.

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Fiat/Fiat Professional

Fiat is the bread and butter of FCA, no matter what anyone else says. I mean, it’s one of two brands that’s in the actual company’s name, and the only one in the company’s name that isn’t a glowing husk of what they once were! But even though they only sell three cars in America, you’d be surprised to know that Fiat still has a strong hold on many markets in many different countries. Let’s take a look and see what they have to offer.

Fiat Mobi

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The Mobi is the smallest car that Fiat currently produces which is only available in the South American market. It’s mainly a competitor to the Volkswagen up!, so that explains its small stature. You can order it in six different versions with some interesting names (Easy, Easy On, Like, Like On, Way, and Way On), so people in Latin America have many different styles to choose from. It’s kinda cute to me, but I digress.

Fiat Panda

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The Panda is an all but familiar face in the Fiat lineup, and is the dashing car of choice for a Mr. James May. It seems that not much has changed over the years for the venerable little Panda, which is a car that I’d gladly take over here in America. But, I highly doubt that’ll ever really happen.

Fiat 500

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For 2019, the 500 stays largely unchanged for its ninth year available in America. I suppose there’s not much you really can change without changing up the whole car itself, and I have to say, the design all around has aged pretty well. I like the 500, so I can’t really complain, it’s a fun means to zip where ever you may roam in the world.

Fiat Uno

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Yet another South American-only car, the [Novo] Uno is an extension of a beloved old Fiat subcompact, though it seems to be surviving now with some crossover influence.

Fiat Argo

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Fiat seems to really care a lot about the Latin American market, as the Argo is yet another exclusive to that region. I read a little bit of the press release for the Argo, and I saw a lot of stuff about soul and sportiness, so I guess this is supposed to be some kind of Honda Fit or Mazda2 competitor. It even comes in blue.

Fiat Cronos

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If I would have known how many South America-only Fiats there are, I would have never taken up this project.

Fiat Linea

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FINALLY, A CAR THAT’S SOLD OUTSIDE SOUTH AMERICA. The Linea is some kind of compact saloon that Fiat sells in various parts of Europe, Africa, and Asia. It’s largely been replaced by the aforementioned Cronos in Fiat’s lineup, but the Linea still manages to hold on in some markets for some reason. It looks like that family up there is pretty happy about it though.

Fiat Tipo/Egea

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As I mentioned above under the Dodge Neon, the Tipo is Fiat’s latest compact saloon for its home market, and some other markets where it’s sold as the Egea. It’s a nice little thing, and apparently is still not bad, so hey.

Fiat 124 Spider

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Back to something a little more familiar, I already covered the 124 Spider under Abarth for the most part. It also stays largely unchanged for 2019, as 2018 saw the addition of an Abarth-esque S-Design model and a few changes throughout.

Fiat 500X

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Fiat’s humble compact crossover, which gave its platform to create the Jeep Renegade, has been updated for 2019 with new upgrades both inside and out. The most remarkable new additions include 124-style LED accents in the headlights, an updated interior with new infotainment and safety additions, and a new slew of motors. Still no word on the Abarth variant I so desperately desire.

Fiat 500L

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The 500L received a huge update for 2018, so 2019 is a bit of a slower year for the crossover/MPV thing. All I know is it’s still very ugly and uncomfortable, and I’d rather not think too much about it. The Cross version looks interesting, though.

Fiat Doblo

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The Doblo may be familiar to you because it lives a life in America as the Ram ProMaster City. Back in its home turf, however, it lives a life more similar to the Transit Connect, with commercial and consumer van appointments both available for purchase.

Fiat Ducato

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Known as the regular ProMaster in the states, the Ducato is yet another in Fiat’s “Professional” line of trucks and vans. This gigantic work van is quite popular in Europe apparently, earning it rebadges sold by various brands across the continent.

Fiat Fiorino/Qubo

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This little van is sort of similar to the Doblo, but it’s much, much smaller than the latter. It’s actually sold as two separate models, with the Fiorino line being a commercial van under the Professional line, and the Qubo taking up passenger van sales. I could have thought there was a Ram version of this sold in the states, but I was hugely mistaken. Carry on.

Fiat Talento

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Yet another huge commercial van, this one apparently a rebadge of an already existing Renault van (the Trafic). Nothing remotely special.

Fiat Strada

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Ahhh the Strada, the forbidden fruit I’ve craved for so long (f*ck you chicken tax). The first of a few pickups made by Fiat, and one of three that isn’t based on a work van in some way shape or form. Nice!

Fiat Toro

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A step up from the small Strada is the recently-introduced Toro, a small-ish pickup that’s sold only in...you guessed it...SOUTH AMERICA!!! It’s an interesting looking thing though, isn’t it...kind of reminds me of that pickup that Hyundai is trying to make in some ways.

Fiat Fullback

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And finally, there’s the Fiat Fullback, which is essentially a rebadge of the Mitsubishi L200 pickup already sold in Europe and other countries. I’m just glad I’m done with Fiat so we can move on to more interesting things.

Jeep

I’m pretty darn certain that Jeep is the biggest cash cow of FCA. Their wide array of crossovers and SUVs are the hottest stuff in the current CUV-crazed world, so it’s easy to see why so much lies upon Jeep. How much variety really is there, though?

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Jeep Renegade

The Renegade was a huge gamble for Jeep back in 2014. Not only was the B-crossover segment only just becoming a thing, no one was sure that anyone really wanted a B-crossover that was also a Jeep. Luckily that gamble has paid off tenfold, so Jeep celebrated by updating the Renegade for 2019. The new Renegade features slight updating to the styling, including new LED rings around the headlights (mimicking the new Wrangler), new engines, and some slight updates to the interior as well.

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Jeep Wrangler

Coming off the back of the big release of the JL for 2018, the Wrangler is receiving little to no updates for 2019. That’s a good thing, right?

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Jeep Gladiator

I was tempted to rope the Gladiator in with the Wrangler, seeing as they’re practically identical, I decided not to just because it’s the hottest thing to talk about revolving around Jeep at the moment. It’s going on sale next year as a 2020 model, and despite my overall meh feelings about it, it’s bound to sell pretty well, I believe.

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Jeep Compass

The Compass is probably the most bland of all the Jeep crossovers, but it’s still a pretty nice thing to deal with. It goes mostly unchanged for 2019, with small new options and colors that may or may not be available. I don’t know, I didn’t read too much into it.

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Jeep Cherokee

While I like the new Cherokee overall, I don’t like what they did to it for 2019. The new design seems a bit same-y with all over crossovers in the segment; I much preferred the distinct look of the 2014-2018 models instead. Nevertheless, the new design is not the only addition to the new Cherokee. For 2019, an all-new upscale Overland package is added, along with interior tweaks and new color additions.

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Jeep Grand Commander

Don’t let the clickbait titles fool you, the Grand Commander is not the long awaited new Grand Wagoneer. It is, in fact, a three-row crossover that’s slotted between the Grand Cherokee and the regular Cherokee. It’s also only available in China for some reason, even though I think it’d sell like crazy in the States.

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Jeep Grand Cherokee

The Grand Cherokee is a bit of an old faithful in Jeep’s lineup. As it stands right now, it is the oldest model in the lineup, with its basic design dating back to 2011 with some minor updates coming throughout the years. But, it’s still a solid seller, and I don’t see that changing any time soon.

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Lancia

Lancia’s still alive, somewhat. Actually, it’s pretty obvious they’re on life support with not much left in them. It’s really sad, honestly, I’m sure we all grew up wanting a Stratos or Delta Integrale at least once in our lifetime.

Lancia Ypsilon

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Unfortunately, Lancia’s one car that’s still in production is this hateful little subcompact called the Ypsilon. It’s most certainly a car. There’s rumors that some kind of new limited production Stratos is coming, but I’ll believe it when I see it. Until then...it was nice knowing you, Lancia.

Maserati

Another brand that seems to be barely hanging on, Maserati is at least doing a little bit better than Lancia. The build quality might be lacking and they may only just be a former shell of themselves, but at least they’re around, right?

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Maserati GranTurismo/GranCabrio

The GranTurismo is an absolute dinosaur. The rest of the supercar class has left it so far behind, the only reason its even still alive anymore seems to be because it’s the cheapest way to get into some real Italian firepower, and because Maserati wants to keep itself grounded to its roots in some way. It does still look great, at least, and the 2018 update to the exterior really made it shine. I think it’s time to take it out to pasture, though...it’s only making a fool of itself the longer it stays here.

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Maserati Ghibli

The Ghibli is the car that gave Maserati some leverage in the states. With it, the Quattroporte, and the GranTurismo, Maserati had enough of a lineup to expand into a dealership network alongside Fiat and finally branch into something resembling a respectable luxury brand. For 2019, the Ghibli receives an updated exterior with a few new lines to match itself with the updated GranTurismo and new Levante.

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Maserati Quattroporte

The Quattroporte is one of those cars that you’re surprised to hear they still make. But when you really think about it, isn’t it a good thing they still make it? Along with the GranTurismo, this feels like one of the more Maserati cars that they currently sell, and due to the 2019 refresh, doesn’t offend your eyes that much anymore. It’s probably the Maserati I’d be most inclined to buy...if I had the money to buy a Maserati.

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Maserati Levante

The Levante is surrounded with controversy, but I think it doesn’t deserve it. This is the car single-handedly keeping Maserati alive. It’s a car that needed to happen, or else Maserati would go the way of Lancia. Plus, the only thing that’s really going against it is the price, which seems really outrageous when you consider all you’re getting. Nevertheless, for 2019, the Levante gains two sporty variants, the GTS and Trofeo, so you can keep your Maserati performance blood even if you have to concede to the CUV market.

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Ram

Ram is another brand, like Jeep, that makes up so much of FCA’s sales nowadays that they could honestly run the brand by itself and still be profitable. That’s saying a lot, considering they only really sell three models, but it’s the types of cars those models are that really makes the difference.

Ram 700

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In a bizarre turn of events, it turns out that Ram is sold in countries outside of America. Go figure. This is the Ram 700, the smallest in the Ram line, which is a rebadged Fiat Strada for the Colombian market. I guess Fiat doesn’t dominate all of South America after all.

Ram 1000

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Another Colombian market darling, this is a rebadged Fiat Toro. All of that aside, I challenge you to go to google images and see how long it takes you to find an image of a 2019 Ram 1000 besides the one I posted here.

Ram 1200

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In the UAE, customers are treated to this rebadged Fiat Fullback/Mitsubishi L200 called the Ram 1200. It’s cool, I guess.

Ram 1500

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This is the Ram that you all know. It’s obvious that the Ram received a huge update for 2019, consisting of an entire new model of the 1500 for the states with new styling, new engines, and all sorts of goodies. It’s still pretty fresh off the presses, so there’s really not much more to report.

Ram Heavy Duty

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In other news, the Ram Heavy Duty is still the same old Ram you know and love, virtually unchanged for 2019. I expect a new version to follow the 1500 in 2010.

Ram ProMaster

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As mentioned before, the ProMaster is a rebadged Fiat Ducato van for the American market. A solid competitor in the commercial van market, the ProMaster received little changes for 2019, apart from a new front grille that replaces the old crosshair grille with a new “Ram” text logo.

Ram ProMaster City

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And just like the ProMaster before it, the ProMaster City is yet another rebadge of a Fiat van, this time the Doblo from earlier. It also receives very few updates for 2019, with the inclusion of a new grille with the aforementioned Ram logo grille.

And so, in conclusion...this was a mistake. But I hope you all enjoyed knowing every single car produced by FCA at this day and age, and I may do this again with another company, maybe GM or Ford? Who knows.